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Contact the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin 1-866-900-7078

How Good Are You at Eating & Talking on the Phone While Driving? Take Our Test.

Sixteen states and the District of Columbia have passed laws making it illegal to talk on the phone while driving. North Carolina may be next. If some NC lawmakers have their way, by 2020 it will be against the law to talk on the phone while driving.

As personal injury lawyers, we think this is a good thing.

Think You’re Good at Multitasking While Driving?

We are not wired to get behind the wheel and text, talk on the phone, or even eat fries. (Eating behind the wheel, incidentally, has been shown to be more distracting than using a cell phone to text or talk.) Face it. Wielding a two-ton vehicle at 60 mph on an eight-lane highway surrounded by 18-wheelers and your garden variety of inattentive drivers is no place for multitasking distractions of any kind.

Yet why can’t we stop? We know the statistics and understand the devastating consequences of one split second gone wrong. But what makes us continue to check that text or voicemail. Spoiler alert: your own brain’s dopamine production. Click here for your chemistry lesson explaining why it is so hard not to check that text message while driving.

Everyone Multitasks Behind the Wheel

It seems as though everyone is a drive-by multitasker. It’s something we’ve done since the early days of auto travel. Today, not only is it hard to stop multitasking while driving, but we tend to think we are better at it than we really are. (Oh yes you do, admit it.)

But are you as good at multitasking as you think? Click here for a fun and quick exercise that can help you find out.

What Do You Think About People Who Multitask While Driving?

Are you a “hang up and drive” person? Or are you the one applying mascara at a stoplight on Trade and Tryon in Uptown Charlotte? Tell us on the social media links below what you thought of this exercise. Better yet, share this exercise with your teen drivers!

 

Wheel Runoff Accidents – Will Insurance Try to Blame You?

No one is prepared for a wheel to come off their car while they are careening down the I-85 near Greensboro or the I-77 near Charlotte. Nor are they usually prepared to encounter a runaway tire as they are headed down the I-40 to the Crystal Coast. Yet it happens more often than you might realize.

Crashes involving a detached wheel are known as wheel runoff or detached wheel accidents.

A Wheel Runoff Crash Is a Road Debris Crash

A wheel runoff accident is often referred to as a road debris crash. Approximately two-thirds of road debris-related crashes involved debris that became detached from a vehicle, including wheels, tires, driveshafts, etc. These items can either strike another vehicle as they detach or remain on the roadway and contribute to a crash.

Our firm has represented thousands of car wreck cases, some of them wheel runoff accidents. Here is how these types of accidents happen – and who can potentially be at fault when they do happen. (Spoiler alert – you could potentially be blamed even if you are the victim.)

Wheel Runoff Accident Causes

Many things can cause a car wheel to fall off while in route. Some of the more common can include:

  • Over-torqueing the lug nut: Overtightening the bolts that are used to secure the wheel to the car. This is the most common cause of wheel runoff accidents.
  • Under-torqueing the lug nut: When the bolts securing the wheel to the car aren’t secured tightly enough.
  • Wheel paint thickness: When the paint on a wheel is too thick, causing parts to become defective.
  • Hub failure: Like the lug nut, the hub of the wheel can become defective if it the axle nut is too tight or too loose. Additionally, the hub can lack necessary lubrication or be overloaded.

Some Reasons Why Wheels Detach

Experience has taught us that typically the causes mentioned above are usually a result of an error during the wheel maintenance or installation process. Here are some specific examples:

  • Incorrect use of tools: Over-torqueing the lug nut occurs because of the widespread use of impact wrenches. These tools make it fast and easy to add a lot of torque. But sometimes this results in dangerous outcomes when used incorrectly.
  • Use of defective tools: Under-torqueing can be caused by using cheap or worn out wrenches.
  • Hasty remanufacturing: Paint thickness defects can potentially occur when tire dealers and traders try to quickly repaint wheels to make them look new for resale.
  • Not following procedure: Correct axle installation involves following detailed steps to adjust and preload bearings.
  • Improper maintenance: Hub failures are usually progressive and often come with warning signs. These include leaking hub seals, tire tread wear anomalies, strange sounds and smells coming from the car, and smoke.

Who Is at Fault for Wheel Runoff Crashes and Injuries?

Wheel runoff accidents can be complex and must be investigated thoroughly to try to determine who was at fault. Negligence can sometimes be found in:

The driver or owner of the car. Did the driver or owner know about the defect? Was the owner a private party or was the vehicle a company vehicle? Maintenance records must be thoroughly examined and, in some cases, mechanics may need to be interviewed.

The mechanic or repair shop. While there are many exceptional mechanics throughout North Carolina, as in every profession, some can be less than exceptional. Of course, no mechanic wants to admit fault, and in many cases, they may not have been aware that they potentially contributed to the wheel runoff situation. It takes an experienced car accident attorney who is skilled at interviewing potentially negligent parties to try to uncover the truth as to who was at fault.

The manufacturer of the wheel or wheel part. While many of these errors are caused by those performing car maintenance and upgrades, wheel runoff accidents can also be caused by manufacturer defects. In late 2018, Toyota recalled the 700 2019 C-HR Crossovers because of axle issues that could cause the rear tires to come off. It seems that tire recalls are almost as common as new tires, themselves. Michelin, Firestone, Goodyear, Bridgestone – all have had recalls for one reason or another. When an accident occurs because a tire failed to function properly, the manufacturer or distributor could potentially be found negligent.

Contributory Negligence – Are You Partially at Fault?

There’s one more entity that the insurance company could try to pin the blame on. You.

North Carolina is one of the few states known as a contributory negligence state. In insurance terms, that means that, barring a few exceptions, if you are at found to be fault for an accident or injury – even partially, just 1%, for example – the insurance company may not have to compensate you for your injuries or damages. Worse, you may even have to pay for some of the damages caused from the accident or injury.

NC Personal Injury Lawyers Offer Free Case Evaluation

If you have been injured in a wheel runoff accident we urge you not to try to settle with the insurance company on your own.

Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer to represent them received 3.5X more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own*

Contact us or call 1-866-900-7078 for a free case evaluation.

 

*Insurance Research Council, 1999.

Can You Sue With an App? (Yes. But Beware of Limitations)

Picture this. You’re injured in a fender bender and have slight to moderate medical repercussions – a broken nose, whiplash, a black eye, and bruises. Your medical and physical therapy expenses after you visit the doc amount to roughly $3,000.

The at-fault driver’s insurance company is dinging around about paying you the entire amount you owe for medical expenses. They claim you are only owed $900. You need the full amount, and you need it sooner rather than later.

Do you:

  1. Contact an experienced personal injury law firm to fight for the maximum amount you are allowed by law including injuries, time out of work and potentially other expenses incurred?
  2. Download the new lawsuit app, DoNotPay, which claims it can bring a lawsuit on your behalf with a swipe and a download or two to try to get your medical expenses reimbursed?

DoNotPay App for Small Claims Lawsuits

The DoNotPay app claims to allow users to bring small claims lawsuits (up to $25,000) without the use of an attorney. Wait, what? An app that acts like a lawyer?

Yes and no.

It can help you sue by using a bot to read your case and then offers you general guidelines as to your next steps in the legal process. The app claims to allow users to sue in small claims court without having to retain a lawyer. And if you win your claim you keep 100% of the damages received. For now, the app is free.

What Type of Claim Can the Lawsuit App Help With?

The app claims that you may be able to sue for up to $25,000 for a variety of potential claims, including:

  • Negligence
  • Breach of contract
  • Un-refunded deposits
  • Consumer refund
  • Automobile accidents

How Does the Lawsuit App Work?

Here is how the app purportedly works. It asks for your name and address and the size of your claim. It then generates a demand letter, creates a filing, and helps serve notice of the lawsuit.

According to motherboard.com, the app walks you through the process of filing a notice of the suit. If you go to court, it will generate scripts you can use in court. A bot will ask you a few basic questions about your legal issue and use your answers to classify your case into 1 of 15 different legal areas. The app will then draw up documents specific to that legal area, and fill in the details. You print the completed document and mail it to the courthouse to establish that you’re a plaintiff in a lawsuit.

Who might use such an app? Some people do not seek a lawyer in small claims proceedings because it is either not permitted by law or because the amount of damages to be paid may not justify the cost of an attorney.

What Can an Attorney Do That the Lawsuit App Cannot?

Let’s take a closer look a typical car accident victim.


Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer received 3.5 times* more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own.


The app cannot completely and fully understand all the nuances of a case. It does not review the case for accuracy, draw legal conclusions, or provide opinions about your selections of forms. I can tell you that no app can spot missed opportunities or offer the advantages than an experienced lawyer could.

CYA (cover your assets). From the very first phone call you will have with the at-fault driver’s insurance adjuster, we can help. You will be asked to give what is known as a “recorded statement.” The recorded statement is designed for the benefit of the insurance company. You may think you’re being asked seemingly innocuous questions and not think much about your answers – until your answers come back to hurt you, and the insurance company claims you are to blame. Believe me, we have seen this happen often.

Click here for a true story about how the story can change just like that.

Keep track of medical care. After about three months of treatment, your injuries amounted to $3,000. But what happens if the impact that caused your broken nose began to cause you to experience chronic migraines six months down the road? What if a doctor says those migraines were not caused by the crash? Trauma can often beget more trauma later.

Take care of the paperwork hassles. The amount of medical and other paperwork, alone, that plaintiffs’ have to keep up with can be overwhelming – and is sometimes a reason people turn to us for help. Not handling it properly and within the strict timeframes of the insurance companies can often hurt a clients’ case if they don’t know what, when, or how to file correctly.

Fight for the maximum amount you are allowed by law. I cannot tell you the number of times when there seems to be little or “no” money available to pay a client for damages, such as in a case involving an uninsured or underinsured driver. That doesn’t stop us from seeking to try to find other income sources, such as second homes, cars, trucks, boats, and other non-exempt sources for funds. We routinely conduct thorough and meticulous research to try to piece together clues – reading between the lines, consulting with experts, and looking for that needle in a haystack that can sometimes yield an unlikely or alternative source of finances.

Personal attention every step of the way. As with any endeavor, there’s often a circuitous path from point A to point B. Life is full of twists, turns, and surprises – and lawsuits are no different. We strive to forestall any surprises to try to lift your burden at each step of the way.

An app cannot empathize with you, represent you in court, or negotiate a resolution.


If you are looking to handle your case on your own, we can help with that too. Click here for a do-it-yourself personal injury booklet we wrote for injury victims who want to try to handle their claim on their own.


Our Contingency Fee Is Designed to Offer You Flexibility

Cost shouldn’t be a reason to resort to a legal app instead of potentially taking advantage of all the benefits a lawyer can offer. Our attorneys do not get paid an attorney’s unless you win or your case settles. Our Founder and President, James S. Farrin said:


If we don't achieve a result for a client, we don't get an attorney’s fee. I love that because — if we can't get someone a result, I don't want a fee. We're not paid on the hours we work on the case or the time we put in. We have one incentive, and that is to get our client a result."


We advocate for you in an effort to try to get you the maximum compensation you potentially deserve. Will an app call your medical practitioner repeatedly to obtain your medical records? Will an app review them for accuracy? Probably not. Will an app personally visit witnesses when necessary to depose them and take their statement? Will an app try to gather all the facts, and then some, in an effort to leave no stone unturned? Will an app return your calls and lend an empathetic ear?

Get a Free Case Evaluation from NC Attorneys

Our firm is comprised of experienced, legal professionals (and that includes our paralegals) who will strive to get you the best compensation you potentially deserve. If you have been hurt by someone’s negligence, contact the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin or call 1-866-900-7078.

 

*Insurance Research Council 1999

What Kind of Medical Treatment Can I Receive Under Workers’ Comp Insurance?

If you're injured on the job and your workers' compensation claim is approved, workers' comp will pay for your medical treatment. That's great! But what exactly does that mean to you?

That's a loaded question.

What Is Medical Compensation?

Under the North Carolina Workers' Compensation Act "medical compensation" can include virtually anything that will cure your pain, give you relief from pain, and/or get you well enough to get back to work.

Treatment can include:

  • Medical
  • Surgical
  • Hospital
  • Nursing
  • Rehabilitative services, such as:
    • Attendant care services: At-home care or physical therapy
    • Vocational rehabilitation: In some circumstances, the insurance company will pay for retraining or for a specialist to help you find another job
  • Medicines
  • Sick travel: Reimbursement for any travel to authorized medical providers or pharmacies more than 10 miles away
  • Other treatment

While it may seem as though you're entitled to just about anything that will help you get better, who gets to decide what will help you get better. You or the insurance company?

1756873Who Decides What Medical Treatment Is Necessary?

If your workers' compensation case is accepted by the workers' comp insurance company, they are responsible for paying for your medical treatment. The flip side is: they also have the right to direct your care.

That means the workers' comp insurance company can send you to the doctor or doctors they choose. Keep in mind, many insurance companies are for profit businesses - not nonprofits. That means if there's a choice of treatments and doctors who might claim to be able to achieve the same results, but one option is less expensive than the other and may even get you back to work quicker, it would likely benefit the insurance company to opt for the less expensive, get-back-to-work-quicker option. Even if your doctor recommends a more expensive treatment and potentially longer recovery period for you, the insurance company may refuse to authorize it. So what can you do if they refuse the treatment you'd rather have?

How Can I Control What Treatment I Get?

Fighting for the treatment our clients feel they need is something we deal with day in and day out. It's one of the primary reasons people contact our firm.

If the workers' compensation doctor recommends treatment the insurance company refuses to pay for, our attorneys can file a motion for a hearing or a motion for medical treatment.

You also have the right to request a second opinion exam with a physician that you and the insurance company agree on. Our workers' compensation attorneys have years of experience fighting on our clients' behalf to try to get them the second opinions they may need

If you wish to transfer your treatment to another doctor, our attorneys can file a motion with the NC Industrial Commission (that's the workers' compensation "court") to try to transfer that care for you.

Our NC Workers' Comp Attorneys Will Review Your Case for Free

If you feel you're not getting the treatment you need, or that your insurance company may not have your best interests at heart, contact us or call 1-866-900-7078.

Let one of our workers' comp attorneys - six of whom are North Carolina Board Certified Specialists in Workers' Compensation Law - evaluate your situation for free. We're available 24/7 to try to get you the answers you need.

(PS...If you're worried that you can't afford us, stop worrying! We work on contingency, which means that you don't pay any attorney's fee unless we get you compensation.)

How Does My North Carolina Workers’ Compensation Attorney Get Paid?

"How do I pay you?"

I get this question all the time. Let's face it, money doesn't grow on trees. An injury at work can make a tight financial situation even tighter and nobody wants to worry about money when they're hurting (that's what we do for you!).

But as nice as it would be for someone else to work on getting your workers' comp payments started, or negotiating for more money, if your work injury has you struggling to put food on the table, how can you possibly afford to pay a lawyer?

NEVER FEAR! CONTINGENCY FEES ARE HERE!

Let me try to ease your mind while answering some important questions about attorney's fees for workers' compensation cases in North Carolina.

What Is a Contingency Fee?

To put it simply, a contingency fee means your lawyer doesn't get paid an attorney's fee unless you get paid. If you have a workers' compensation case in North Carolina, you should almost never have to worry about paying your attorney's fees out of your own pocket.

Here's How Contingency Fees Work

In North Carolina, your workers' comp attorney's fee is regulated by the state and must be approved by the Industrial Commission. The standard fee is 25%, which usually comes out of any payments your attorney helps you collect from the insurance company. These payments can come in many different forms, depending on the details of your particular case. Here are just a few possible examples of payments you may be entitled to receive after an on-the-job injury:

  • A weekly check from the insurance company while you're out of work
  • A monetary judgment after taking your case to court (and winning!)
  • A lump sum settlement after negotiating with the insurance company at the end of your case

Please keep in mind that every workers' compensation case is unique so there's no guarantee that any or all of the payments described above will apply to you. However, one thing is certain: if you have a workers' compensation case in North Carolina, you should almost never have to worry about paying your attorney's fees out of your own pocket.

Are There Any Other Fees I Should Expect?

Whether there might be other fees depends. Some North Carolina workers' compensation attorneys choose to recoup additional costs on top of their 25% fee for expenses related to the administration of your case. This includes things like medical record charges, filing fees, and expert witness costs. In many cases, your attorney's firm will pay these costs upfront on your behalf with the expectation that they will be repaid when your case resolves. It's always a good idea to discuss any additional costs with your lawyer before you sign a retainer.

How Do Contingency Fees Benefit Injured Workers?

The contingency fee system is particularly important for injured workers!

In my experience, work-related injuries almost always result in some level of financial hardship. Without contingency fees, thousands of injured workers throughout the state would be unable to afford legal representation, leaving the door open for insurance companies to call all the shots.

Contingency fees also level the playing field. Think about it. With regulated attorney's fees, you shouldn't have to worry about a particular lawyer being "too expensive." This gives you an opportunity to do your research and find the best candidate to help you.

A Workers' Comp Attorney Can Potentially Help:

  • Move your case along quicker to get your payments started.
  • Negotiate a higher settlement than you may be able to on your own.
  • Obtain medical benefits the insurance company is denying.
  • Attain a measure of job security, if for example, the insurance company forces you to go back to a made up job, which may be disguised as "light duty," "modified duty," or "restrictive" employment. These jobs are sometimes eliminated later.
  • Give you added peace of mind knowing you have someone championing your rights against Big Insurance.

Click here for many other good reasons to hire a NC workers' comp attorney.

We know you're hurting. Fortunately, North Carolina has a contingency fee structure in place that is designed to help keep your wallet from hurting too.

North Carolina Workers' Comp Attorneys

Don't let the thought of fees prevent you from potentially getting the legal and financial help you deserve.

If you've been injured at work, click here to contact us right away or give us a call at 1-866-900-7078. Let one of our workers' comp attorneys - six of whom are North Carolina Board Certified Specialists in Workers' Compensation Law - evaluate your situation for free!

PS: Check out these helpful workers' comp booklets:

How to Choose a Lawyer for Your Workers' Compensation Claim

How to Take Control of Your Workers' Compensation Claim

 

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Do I Owe Taxes on My Social Security Disability Benefits?

Just because the government pays you Social Security Disability benefits doesn't necessarily mean you don't have to pay the government its portion back. It's like the old adage says: Nothing is certain but death and taxes.

If you're in certain income brackets, you may owe taxes on the benefit money you receive. Part of your Social Security benefits may be taxed if:

  • You are single and your total income is more than $25,000
  • You are married and you and your spouse have total income of more than $32,000

Paying Your SSD Taxes - Two Ways to Get Your SSA 1099

If you fit into either of the categories above, you will likely need to pay taxes on your benefits and the Social Security Administration should have sent your SSA 1099, which shows how much you received in Social Security Disability benefits.

If you have not received your 1099, here are two ways to get it.

Access Your Social Security Benefits Info Online

  • Go to the Social Security Website's my Social Securitypage
  • Click on the "Sign In or Create an Account" button
  • Log In
  • Select the "Replacement Documents" tab for your 1099

If you want to keep track of your earnings each year, you can also use your personal my Social Security account for that, as well.

Call the Social Security Office
You can also obtain a replacement benefits statement by calling the Social Security office at 1-800-772-1213 or by calling your local Social Security office.

This blog is not intended to constitute written tax advice within the meaning of IRS Circular 230 §10.37, the author intends by this communication to share general information for discussion purposes only, and you should not interpret the statements otherwise.

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Why Can’t My Lawyer Name the Insurance Company in the Lawsuit?

A question we tend to hear in our law firm is why, in a courtroom situation, their lawyer cannot name the insurance company in the lawsuit.

The short answer is because the insurance company did not cause the accident. Therefore they cannot be sued. The at-fault driver caused the accident, so he or she is the one being sued. That driver is simply using the insurance company's money to pay whatever damages must be paid. And the insurance company is in court with their legal representation in an attempt to generally try to pay out as little as possible.

Admittedly, it's easy to get confused.

Why Can't You Name the Insurance Company of the At-Fault Driver?
The reason for this is simple: Insurance companies have deeper pockets than the average person, and that could sway a jury to ask for more money. This premise is misleading, however. The insurance company is only going to pay what they have been contracted to pay, which is limited by the policy limits of the at-fault driver.

However, clients may ask this question because they're worried about the exact opposite. In other words, if they DON'T name the insurance company, the jury might be swayed to ask for LESS money.

The logical question then is, what happens if a jury awards more than the policy limits? If a jury awards more than the other driver's insurance coverage, it's called an "excess judgment." The at-fault driver will have to pay the difference between the policy limits and the excess judgment.

Let's say, for example, the driver's policy limits were $60,000 and a jury awarded you $85,000 in damages. The driver would need to cough up that additional $15,000 in order for you to get the full amount. Easier said than done.

Getting an individual to pay can get complicated. That is why it is prudent to get an attorney involved soon after your accident - one who is experienced in investigating and identifying ways the at-fault driver may be able to pay.

Experienced Personal Injury Lawyers in North Carolina
My advice is to work with a legal team like ours with many years of experience in personal injury litigation. We are dedicated to taking every available measure and utilizing every resource that may potentially help secure the best outcome for your case. Better still, we don't charge an attorney's fee unless you recover.

If you have questions, or want to see if we can help you or someone you know, click here for a FREE case evaluation or give us a call at 1-866-900-7078. We're here for you 24/7/365.

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What Should Injured Amtrak Passengers Do And What Will the Investigation Attempt to Uncover?

Earlier this week the Carolinian, an Amtrak passenger train out of Charlotte, derailed in Halifax, NC, at the U.S. 301 and N.C. 903 crossing, after hitting an overloaded tractor-trailer that was stuck on the tracks.

Tractor Trailer Front_07032014The truck was being escorted by a State Highway Patrol trooper and according to witnesses, it was stuck for 15-20 minutes before the train hit.

"That's plenty of time to stop a train. If all the facts are right, this accident should have never happened," said attorney Elizabeth Overmann, who worked for a railroad defense firm for 4 years, prior to joining the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin.

But unfortunately, for the 54 people injured onboard, the train wasn't stopped in time, leaving lots of people with questions.

What the Amtrak Investigation Should Attempt to Uncover

Someone's insurance company will be liable for all the injuries passengers onboard the Amtrak train sustained, but whose? Injured passengers who want payment for their medical bills may need to buckle up for a long ride (no pun intended) as companies try to fight it out.

The following questions will likely be at the forefront of the argument:

  • Which company determined the route the truck took?
    The truck that got stuck was 164 feet long and transporting a modular electrical building. This is an extremely long truck and an oversized load. Was an engineering firm hired to devise the route the truck should take? Did the trucking company plan the route? Did they take into account the train's schedule and the potential difficulty getting across this crossing? 
  • Was the truck driver negligent?

Did the truck driver ignore precautions or take a different route? Did he have the proper experience and training to attempt the maneuver? Was he simply not careful enough? Was he aware of the train's schedule?

  • Did Highway Patrol try to warn the train?

This is the main question of the hour. Every railroad crossing has a phone number to call in the event of a situation like this one. Did the patrolman try to call or radio in? Did he have flares or something he could have used to warn the train?

  • Did CSX fail to pass on the message? Was their crossing unsafe?

CSX is the company that owns the rail lines.  If they received a warning call from the highway patrol and failed to pass the message to Amtrak, they will likely be liable.

Further, Steve Ditmeyer, a former Federal Railroad Administration official who teaches railway management at Michigan State University has been quoted saying that the intersection was a "bad geometry crossing" (not a 90-degree angle) and the slope created a situation where it would be difficult for the engineer to see the road ahead and the truck driver to see down the track.

  • Did Amtrak's communication fail? Was their driver negligent?

Maybe warning reached Amtrak, but failed to reach the driver for some reason. Or maybe the driver was going faster than the 70 mph speed limit - which could have contributed to the situation and Amtrak might be held liable.

How an Amtrak Train Accident Differs From a Car Accident

Since train accidents almost always involve multiple parties (such as in the Halifax tractor-trailer derailment), these cases can get complicated rather quickly. If you've been in a train accident and you're not careful, you could be left with bills in hand, as companies draw out the liability fight. If that sounds like what's happening to you, contact an attorney - fast.

Further complicating your case, Amtrak is owned by the government, likely making your case a federal case. Meaning if you chose to pursue compensation for your damages, your attorney would likely have to pursue the case in accordance with federal laws and be admitted to the federal court.

It's possible that if your injuries are less serious, or if all parties involved happen to live in the same state, your case would be heard in a state court, but it still might be wise to find an attorney who can go to federal court, if needed.

What to Do If You've Been Injured in An Amtrak Accident

After an accident in which you're not at fault, you're typically owed payment for your medical bills, time out of work, and damages to your wellbeing or property.

Regardless of whether your damages are minor or serious, it's generally wise to get an attorney's advice. Click here for a free case evaluation. We're open 24/7 and well-equipped to handle these types of cases. Plus, you don't pay any attorneys' fees unless you receive compensation for your claim - guaranteed.

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Contact Information

Asheville Law Office

300 Ridgefield Court Suite 309
Asheville, NC 28806
Phone: 828-552-8215
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Charlotte Law Office

1001 Morehead Square Drive, Suite 350
Charlotte, NC 28203
Phone: 704-599-1078
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Durham Law Office

280 South Mangum Street, Suite 400
Durham, NC 27701
Phone: 919-688-4991
Fax: 800-716-7881

Fayetteville Law Office

2915 Raeford Road, Suite 204
Fayetteville, NC 28303
Phone: 910-488-0611
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Goldsboro Law Office

1308 Wayne Memorial Drive, Suite B
Goldsboro, NC 27534
Phone: 919-731-2581
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Greensboro Law Office

300 N. Greene Street, Suite 850
Greensboro, North Carolina 27401
Phone: 336-665-7072
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Greenville Law Office

702 Cromwell Dr. Suite G
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: 252-355-5205
Toll Free: 1-866-780-3227

Henderson Law Office

514 Dabney Drive, Suite 200
Henderson, NC 27536
Phone: 252-492-4600
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

New Bern Law Office

1505 South Glenburnie Rd, Unit P
New Bern, NC 28562
Phone: 252-634-9010
Toll Free: 1-866-780-3422

Raleigh Law Office

4325 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 100
Raleigh, NC 27607
Phone: 919-834-1184
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Roanoke Rapids Law Office

709 Julian R. Allsbrook Highway
Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870
Phone: 252-537-9670
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Rocky Mount Law Office

144 Woodridge Court
Rocky Mount, NC 27804
Phone: 252-937-4730
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Sanford Law Office

703-B South Horner Boulevard
Sanford, NC 27330
Phone: 919-775-1564
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Wilson Law Office

2315 Airport Blvd Suite A
Wilson, North Carolina 27896
Phone: 252-246-9090
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Winston-Salem Law Office

301 N. Main Street, Suite 2409-C
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078