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Why We Are Not Wired to Multitask and Drive

North Carolina Distracted Driving Accident AttorneysBy Sidney Fligel

What is Multitasking?

You know what multitasking is. Everyone does. It’s almost a given these days. I don’t care what task you are performing you are probably in the habit of multitasking while doing it.

I’m multitasking right now.

I’m answering a colleague’s question, kicking off my shoe under the desk, while I am typing this sentence. Meanwhile, Taylor Swift is whining on Spotify about some guy who’s so mean all he’s ever gonna amount to is mean. But she’ll be livin’ in a big ol’ city. Oh… and I just got a ping from my cell – my sister wants me to drive to her house this weekend (150 miles). Her peaches are coming in fast and she has to pick them before the birds eat them. So now I’m also weighing the pros and cons of fighting holiday traffic for a bag of fresh-picked peaches.

But I am stationary behind my computer screen. I am not behind the wheel of a two ton vehicle traveling 60 miles per hour with many other innocent drivers and bystanders nearby.

Do I multitask behind the wheel?

Do you?

Unfortunately we all do. And we may not even realize we do it.

Back in the day it used to be fine to sip a soft drink while driving, and maybe even change the radio “dial” or “roll down” our windows. But that was before seven-lane highways rife with left turns, commuting bicyclists, roadway signage everywhere, and millions of cars on the roads with minivan-wielding soccer moms filled with distracting kids rushing from practice to Chik-fil-A and on to the next practice.

And cell phones. Texting. Bluetoothing.

Our driving habits have become a real mess.

Who’s Guilty of Distracted Driving?

We are all guilty. Teens. Moms. Dads. You. Me.

Many people think distracted driving is a teenager problem. Not entirely. All of us become side-tracked and distracted without even realizing we’re doing it. Or realizing what a mistake it can mean to your life or someone else’s.

I was shopping in a locally-owned shop recently when the owner learned I work at the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin in personal injury. She shared her tragic story of why she had to go back to work after she’d retired. Her husband was hit by a distracted driver, suffered a severe brain injury and had to leave his job as CEO of a major corporation. Their lives took an abrupt about face as they lost nearly everything they had due to medical bills. (He did not hire a lawyer, unfortunately.)

The at-fault driver was a teenager. He was texting.

The woman shared with me how very sad she felt for that teen who was not only unrepentant, but snarky about what his carelessness did to her family.

I was stunned.

One careless mistake and an entire family’s path went south.

Multitasking Behind the Wheel is Epidemic

Distracted driving has become epidemic. National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) statics show distracted driving was the highest cause of “human choice” accidents, with six of 10 caused by distractions.

Cell phones, as we all know, are a common distraction (and one of the most deadly). In the era of Smartphones, one of the most common causes of accidents has been distractions from texting and using apps behind the wheel – even a map app.

Why Our Brains are Not Wired to Multitask

According to numerous research studies, our brains were not designed to focus on multiple tasks at once. Psychologists who study what happens inside your brain when people try to perform more than one task at a time have found that we are not wired for heavy-duty multitasking.

Switching between tasks (multitasking) can cause a whopping 40% loss in brain productivity, and the National Safety Council underscores why multitasking is particularly dangerous behind the wheel.

If you can walk and chew gum at the same time, why can’t you drive and talk on your cell phone? Walking and chewing gum involve both thinking and a non-thinking task. Driving while talking on your phone are two thinking tasks that involve many areas of the brain. Your brain rapidly switches between two cognitive activities rather than processing both simultaneously and some things can get lost or minimized in the switching.

Isn’t talking on a cell phone the same as talking to someone in the car? No. Drivers talking on cell phones are more oblivious to changing traffic conditions because they are the only ones in the conversation who are aware of the road. When you are talking to another adult in the car (with another set of eyes) they may be able to help you remain aware of traffic.

Isn’t using hands-free devices safer than a cell? Research shows it is not. As different parts of our brain share tasks, activity in one part will decrease as activity in another part increases. If you focus on a conversation, whether it’s with another passenger, using a hand held device, or cell phone, activity in the parietal lobe will decrease by as much as 37% says a Carnegie Mellon University study.

When you use a cell phone you get what is known as “inattention blindness.” You look but you may not see. You can miss seeing up to 50% of your driving environment.

Drinking and driving vs. driving while distracted. A study by the University of Utah illustrated in a controlled simulator that using a cell phone while driving is just as dangerous as driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.08, which is the legal limit behind the wheel in North Carolina. Just like alcohol, people can become addicted to their cell phones. Click here to find out the fascinating biological reason why.

Text behind the wheel and you are 23% more likely to cause a crash says the National Highway Transportation Administration (NHTSA) website, nhtsa.gov. As a matter of fact, it’s the same as drinking four beers. Both cause distraction and impaired driving that can result in following too closely, not being able to brake on time, or weaving into oncoming traffic.

We’ve all seen those cars that drift outside their lane. The RAC Foundation, a British motoring research organization, reports that texting while driving reduces steering control by 91%. And it decreases reaction time by 35%.

Multitasking Results in TMI

All of this is a result of too much information causing cognitive overload – our brain’s inability to hold so much information.

We are wired to have a working memory that can retain only two to four pieces of information at a time.

When more is required, our brain replaces the old with the new or it borrows from the auditory and visual parts of the brain.

Even when contemplating the next task, researchers discovered that an interruption – be it a phone call or deciding to check your email can cause you to take up to five minutes to refocus on your work.

Here’s a trivia question for you. What is the #1 distraction behind the wheel? (Keep reading for the answer.)

Just Drive

  • Don’t put your car in drive until you and your passengers are settled in and ready to go.
  • Take the time to check your surroundings and make sure anything you may need while driving is in reach so you won’t need to look for them on the road
  • If you need directions, get them before you put your car in gear

Keep your hands on the wheel and eyes on the road and just drive.

Tell Us Your Good Driving HabitsGet a FREE Case Evaluation from an N.C. Car Wreck Lawyer

If you or a loved one were the victim of any kind of distracted driving accident, we strongly encourage you to seek legal help. We don’t want anyone to end up in a situation like the shop owner whose husband was incapacitated and didn’t hire a lawyer which could have potentially helped save his family from financial ruin as a result of that car wreck.

Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer received 3.5 times more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own*.

Contact us or call 1-866-900-7078 for your free case evaluation.

Trivia answer. The #1 distraction behind the wheel, according to Safestart.com? Wandering thoughts.

* Insurance Research Council 1999

Teen Distractions Behind the Wheel Kill -- 5 Simple Steps That Can Help Save a Life

Summertime means more teens will be driving on our roadways - and many will not be paying attention. Inattention behind the wheel among teens is so widespread that AAA refers to summertime when teens are out of school as the '100 deadliest days for teens.'

Crashes are the leading cause of teen deaths, and distracted driving is thought to contribute to more than half of teen crashes. Worse, teen fatality rates are three times higher than other age groups.

As a father of two teenagers who will be driving on their own soon, these statistics alarm me. As a lawyer, I have seen an exponential growth in distracted driving crashes in recent years.

We're Taking the Distracted Driving Message to High Schools

For these reasons and more my firm has partnered with EnDD.org (End Distracted Driving) and the American Association for Justice (AAJ) to offer a distracted driving educational program to area high schools.

This program was developed by Joel Feldman, an attorney whose 21-year-old daughter was tragically killed by a distracted driver. It is truly unlike any other we know of, and has been extremely well received by more than 300,000 students in 44 states and Canada. And it is recognized by traffic safety experts, including the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Governors Highway Safety Association, as one of the most effective programs for teens.

Joel worked with psychologists and teen safe-driving experts to integrate behavioral science, behavior change theory, and teen-targeted persuasion principles specifically designed to avoid any potential teen backlash of feeling as though someone is trying to restrict their freedom and rights.

We are excited about this effort. And based on feedback, we hope it will help make a positive impact in our communities.

5 Ways You Can Help Curb Distracted Driving

Because distracted driving affects all of us, it's everyone's problem. And this growing and deadly epidemic needs attention from all fronts. Here is what each of us, including you, can do to help try to render distracted driving unacceptable - period.

  • Model appropriate behavior behind the wheel. Don't drive distracted
  • Download, print, and display the YES! I WILL family pledge and safe driving agreement from EndDD.org
  • Visit teendriving.aaa.com/NC for safety resources for your teen drivers
  • Start discussions early on, well before teens reach driving age
  • Take advantage of some of the latest apps (some free) and tech gadgets that can help make it easier for teens (and all of us) to avoid using phones while behind the wheel. Here's an article by a USA Today affiliate which highlights some of them

I urge you to join me in modeling this behavior for our young drivers, so that eventually this dangerous practice will no longer be considered acceptable.

What caused nearly 50,000 car accidents in NC and why can’t we stop it?

DistractedDriving3_072120143,328 people were killed in collisions involving distracted drivers in 2012.

In North Carolina alone, distracted driving was to blame for 49,643 (23.2% of all) car accidents that same year.

And these statistics may not tell the whole story as distracted driving accidents are often under-reported.

There are many behaviors that can be considered "distracted" driving, but texting and driving is considered one of the most common - and one of the most dangerous.

While public education campaigns have been successful in curbing some dangerous behaviors, such as drunk driving, distracted driving education efforts have not had a similar effect.

If you've been injured in a distracted driving accident, click here to contact a North Carolina accident attorney for help.

Texting & Driving Campaigns VS Drunk Driving Campaigns

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and many private companies, such as Toyota, AT&T, State Farm Insurance and Allstate Insurance, have all launched distracted driving campaigns.

The result?

An increased rate in the number of drivers using handheld devices (1.3% in 2011 to 1.5% in 2012).

This is surprising because other campaigns, such as anti-drunk driving, have been able to make a much more significant difference over time.

For example, in 1988, the Harvard School of Public Health's Center for Health Communication launched the U.S. Designated Driver campaign aimed at introducing the "designated driver" concept in an effort to reduce the number of drunk driving accidents.

When the program launched, there had been 23,626 deaths as a result of a crash involving alcohol (1988). By 1991, 52% of Americans under the age of 30 had served as designated drivers and 54% of frequent drinkers said they had been driven home by designated drivers. And by 1992, the number of fatalities had dropped by 24%.

So, why haven't distracted driving campaigns been able to achieve a similar decline in the number of distracted motorists?

DistractedDriving4_07032014Texting & Driving Audience Harder to Reach

One reason might be that drunk driving campaigns were launched at a time when it was much easier to reach a wider audience.

During the 1988 drunk driving campaign, there were just three broadcast networks, which the campaign used heavily to introduce their message - featuring the designated driver in popular TV shows such as "Cheers," "L.A. Law" and "The Cosby Show," as well as numerous public service announcements.

Since today's audience is spread across much more than three stations, it's possible that the texting and driving generation may just be harder to reach in general.

Hard to Enforce = Less Effective

Another issue may be that drunk driving laws are easier to enforce.

Studies have shown that public service campaigns are significantly more effective when combined with "behavioral" measures, such as law enforcement and may be able to reduce the number of collisions by as much as 12%.

North Carolina did pass a ban on texting and driving back in 2009, but senators and law enforcement officers expressed concern that the law would be difficult to enforce. From December 2009 to May 2010, just 71 citations for texting were issued statewide.

Police attributed low enforcement rates to the fact that it is difficult to tell when someone is texting versus making a phone call. If North Carolina were to ban all handheld use of cell phones, this could help to make enforcement easier and thus make safety campaigns more effective.

At the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin, we're committed to helping address the texting and driving problem - by fighting for the victims of these terrible accidents cause.

If you've been injured by a distracted driver, Contact us today at 1-866-900-7078. Our North Carolina accident attorneys will evaluate your case for free.

Parents Can Reduce Teen Crash Risk by 50% - Just By Getting Involved

CarAccident_07212014In 2012 alone, teen drivers in North Carolina crashed more than 40,000 times - resulting in 9,000 injuries and 71 deaths (according to the NC DMV).

That is a lot of car accidents.

But what if half of those accidents could be prevented?

According to a recent study by the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, all it may take is a little more instruction from parents.

The study reported that teens were half as likely to crash and 71% less likely to drink and drive if their parents helped teach them how to drive.

In addition, teens were two times more likely to wear their seat belt and 30% less likely to use a cell phone while driving. North Carolina is taking these statistics seriously and unveiled a new safety campaign aimed at getting parents more involved.

NC's "Parent's Supervised Driving Program"

Fox 8 reported in December that the North Carolina's Division of Motor Vehicles launched the safety campaign with a goal of boosting the amount and quality of training teen drivers receive from their parents.

The campaign, called the "Parent's Supervised Driving Program," encourages parents to go beyond the required 72 hours of supervised driving time and offers a number of important tips, advice, and other supportive materials for parents who are taking their teens on the road for driving lessons.

Under the Parent's Supervised Driving Program campaign, teen drivers will be given a written curriculum for their parents when they obtain their learner's permit. Fox 8 said that this curriculum contains helpful information for parents to make the most of their supervised time together, such as when and where they should take their teens driving.

You can even download their "RoadReady" app that tracks distance traveled, road types, and road conditions against each state's specific driving requirements.

The campaign has been rolled out in several other states and operates entirely off of corporate sponsors.

Parents Need to Get Involved

Despite the evidence illustrating how much teen drivers can benefit from increased supervision while learning how to drive, the Parent's Supervised Driving Program found that only 4% of parents used a resource while teaching their child how to drive and that parents often stop the supervised driving process early or overestimate the time they have spent supervising their teen.

It's clear that increased parental supervision can go a long way toward preventing accidents, and we encourage all parents to take a more active role in training their teens how to drive. You can do your part to make North Carolina roads safe for everyone.

If you've been injured in an accident, contacta car accident lawyer in North Carolina today. At the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin, we'll be happy to evaluate your case for free. Just call us at 1-866-900-7078 today.

Texting + Walking in NC - You Could Get Hurt (And Be Liable)


Remember this video of the woman who fell into a fountain while texting that went viral a couple of years ago?

Although humorous, in interviews after the video became popular, she later reminded viewers about the seriousness of texting and walking, asking: what if that fountain had been a bus?

But despite her warnings, texting and walking has become a real problem with devastating consequences.

Texting While Walking Accidents

A study by Ohio State University earlier this year reported that the number of pedestrians injured because they were distracted by using their phone while walking has more than doubled since 2005.

Further, they report that the researchers believe the actual number of injured pedestrians is much higher due to many not seeking treatment in an emergency room or not reporting the involvement of a cell phone in the accident.

Graph of Pedestrians Distracted by Cell Phones

Courtesy of Ohio State University

"If current trends continue, I wouldn't be surprised if the number of injuries to pedestrians caused by cell phones doubles again between 2010 and 2015," said Jack Nasar, co-author of the study and professor of city and regional planning at Ohio State University.

Efforts to Stop Texting and Walking Accidents in NC

Last year a New Jersey town actually banned texting while walking in response to several fatal pedestrian accidents and now North Carolina has decided it's also time to take action.

According to WFMY News, one of Watch for Me NC campaign's latest initiatives has been focusing on this very problem - encouraging pedestrians to keep their eyes on the road, not on their cell phone screen.

"It's something we see all the time. It's very common, see people walking with their heads down texting....not paying attention to their surroundings," said Officer Brad Smith with UNCG Police in the WFMY story.

He went on to say that the number of distracted pedestrians, combined with the number of distracted drivers, makes for many very dangerous situations.

Texting and Walking Could Be "Contributory Negligence" in NC

In North Carolina, we have what is called "contributory negligence" which basically means that if you're found to have contributed to the accident in any way, the other party (or their insurance company) may not have to pay for your injuries or property damage - even if they were "more" at fault.

In our experience, this means if you were distracted by a cell phone at the time of an accident, an insurance company may try to use that against you to avoid paying your medical bills or other damages.

However, the state of North Carolina does allow for some exceptions to the contributory negligence rule. If you may have contributed to your accident in some way, we highly recommend that you contact a pedestrian lawyer in NC.

NC Pedestrian Accident Lawyers

The injuries from a pedestrian accident can be serious and long-lasting. If you or a loved one were hit by a car, you should contact a North Carolina pedestrian accident lawyer right away.

A NC pedestrian accident lawyer may be able to help you get the medical treatments you need now and provisions for future medical needs.

The Law Offices of James Scott Farrin has helped thousands of residents in North Carolina to get the benefits they needed and we may be able to help you. Give us a call for a free case evaluation today - 1-866-900-7078.

Texting and Driving Video: “From One Second to the Next” An It Can Wait Documentary

CryingGirl_06192014There's a powerful Warner Herzog documentary called "From One Second to the Next" that's making waves right now about the dangers of texting and driving.

There are tear-jerkers.

Then there are sob-wrenchers.

And then there is this video.

Watch it.

These are true stories. If you, or a loved one, sometimes think texting and driving isn't such a big deal, this might change your mind.

(produced by www.itcanwait.org)

Texting and Driving Kills

According to research by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 2011 alone, over 3,000 people were killed in distracted driving crashes.

That's more people than were killed in the 9/11 attacks.

In just that one year, 3,000 mothers, fathers, sons and daughters were taken from families that loved them - families who are now left to live with a gnawing pain that the horrendous accident that killed their loved one could have been prevented.

And people are still being killed. Every. Single. Day.

Not to mention all the victims like Xzavier or Debbie who were not killed, but their lives are forever changed.

Get an NC texting and driving car accident lawyer

Texting and driving is illegal in North Carolina and it ­must be taken seriously.

If you, or a loved one, were the victim of a texting and driving accident, we strongly encourage you to seek legal help.

Dealing with the consequences of a texting and driving accident can be costly and long-lasting, we need drivers to realize what a serious, serious problem this is and taking legal action might just be the push they need.

We're committed to trying to help those injured by a distracted driver, one case at a time. If you need help, please call us for a free case evaluation at 1-866-900-7078.

Why underreported cell phone accidents should matter to you

If you're involved in an accident in North Carolina, the reporting process goes something like this:

  1. Your accident occurs.
  2. The police arrive and determine what caused the accident.
  3. Their findings are compiled into a report.
  4. That report is entered into regional and national databases.
  5. Those databases generate statistics on accident causes each year.

These statistics then influence national prevention priorities, funding decisions, media attention, legislation, and even vehicle and roadway engineering.

Iphone_12292014So, in the end, your accident has a direct impact on where funding, attention and legislation is directed.

But what if the real cause of your accident wasn't reported? And what if 50% of accidents weren't interpreted properly?

Unfortunately, according to a report by the National Safety Council (NSC), that may be the case.

The NSC study:

For their study, the NSC identified 180 fatal crashes from 2009-2011 that were positively connected to cell phone use. Cell phone use was verified via a passenger in the car, someone who had been on the other end of the phone, an investigation or court documents (such as wireless records).

Then they cross-referenced these accidents with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). Here's what they found:

Agreement between NSC review of 180 crash cases and FARS

This chart illustrates that, among the accidents considered in the study, nearly half of cell phone accident cases were unreported in 2011. And in 2010 and 2009, the numbers were much worse.

Agreement between 57 cases where driver admitted cell phone use and FARS
Of course, the best indication of cell phone use is when the driver admits it. This study identified 57 cases (out of their original 180) where the driver openly admitted to using a cell phone at the time of the accident.

As this chart illustrates, even out of those cases, the cell phone usage was only included in the report 50% of the time or less.

Agreement between crash reports with checkbox or numerical codes and FARS
When narrowed down to accidents where the police report contained a specific field for cell phone use, the statistics did somewhat improve, but there is still a significant gap.

"Cell phone use" defined

For the purpose of the study, the NSC defined "cell phone use" as any behaviors where drivers were actively engaged with their cell phone at the time of the crash.

These included behaviors such as: talking; typing or reading text or email; dialing phone numbers; using music, navigation or other apps; looking at phone; and reaching for the phone if it was ringing. A cell phone simply being in the car did not qualify the accident for the study.

What that means in NC:

The study also broke down their data by state for 2011 and 2010. In both instances, North Carolina ranked well below average for reporting cell phone use as a factor in car accidents.

Only .4% of cases in NC identified cell phone use as a factor in fatal crashes in both 2011 and 2010 - meaning our state may be devoting legislation, funding and attention to other, "more important" issues without knowing the real facts.

If you've been injured in an accident:

Texting and driving, or any cell phone usage while driving, can have devastating consequences. If you've been hurt by someone who was distracted behind the wheel, the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin may be able to help.

Give us a call for a free case evaluation today - 1-866-900-7078. We've represented thousands of North Carolinians who've been injured in a car accident and we may be able to help you.

Legislators get serious about texting and driving

Law7_07312014LOL - Lots of Loss

Texting and driving - we all know it's a "no, no," but as drivers continue to ignore warnings, legislators are getting serious about enforcing the rule.

"Distractions while driving" has been part of mainstream conversation about accident causes for years. Whether it's eating, changing the radio station, or talking on a cell phone, research supports the idea that these drivers bring serious risk to the road.

According to textinganddrivingsafety.com, texting while driving accounts for:

  • 1,600,000 accidents per year;
  • 330,000 injuries per year;
  • 11 teen deaths every day;
  • And nearly 25% of all car accidents

 

Legislative response

That's a lot of death and destruction that could have easily been prevented. So what are legislators doing about it? A few recent changes to laws in many states have been:

  • Disallowing talking verbally on the phone, without a hands-free device;
  • Prohibiting all cell phone use, handheld or hands-free;
  • And considering cell phone usage while driving a "primary offense," (meaning you can be pulled over specifically for it, without the officer citing an additional reason).

 

NC's laws on texting and driving

In North Carolina, all drivers are prohibited from texting while driving and it is a primary offense. Only school bus and novice drivers are prohibited from all cell phone usage, both handheld and hands-free.

Harmed by a distracted driver?

Cell phone usage is such a grave issue because each accident it causes could have been prevented. If you, or someone you love, were a victim of a distracted driver's negligence, take action now - call the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin at 1-866-900-7078.

We're tired of seeing people injured, or killed, as the result of cell phone use. If you have been injured by a distracted driver, don't become a victim of their insurance company as well - make sure your rights are protected, contact us today. Representatives are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to offer a no-cost evaluation of your case.

10 Ways to Stay Safe on the Road

 Many accidents can be avoided if all drivers practice safe driving tips on the road. While you can't control what other drivers are doing, you can increase your safety by being more mindful of your own behaviors.

Here are 10 ways that you can stay safe on the road so you can reduce your risks of being involved in an automobile accident:

Wear Your Seat Belt

Even if you're only driving 10 minutes to the store around the corner, put on your seat belt. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, seat belts can reduce serious crash-related injuries and deaths by about 50 percent. Air bags are not an adequate substitute for seat belts.

Speedometer2_07212014Follow the Speed Limit

Don't be tempted to put the pedal to the metal when you're in a rush. Speeding greatly increases your risk of an accident - either with another car or as a result of losing control of your vehicle. Stay within the posted speed limit and make sure you get to your destination safely.

Follow Traffic Rules

Driving rules have been established for a reason: They help keep you safe. Make sure you practice safe driving rules, including maintaining a proper following distance, stopping at all posted signs and lights, ceding the right-of-way, and more.

Text&Drive3_07032014Don't Talk on Your Phone or Text

You may think that you can handle taking a call while driving, but doing so greatly increases your risks of getting into an accident. Texting while driving is even more dangerous as it takes your eyes off the road and your hand off the wheel. Turn off your phone and wait to return calls and texts until you are safely parked.

Don't Put on Makeup While Driving

Many of us try to multi-task when we're in a rush. It's tempting to grab your makeup and try to put it on while you're on the way to work. However, putting on makeup while driving is dangerous as it greatly increases your risks of getting into an accident.

Don't Eat While Driving

Fast food restaurants seem to have been designed to encourage eating on-the-go. However, if you need to hit a drive through on the way home or the way to work, make sure you don't eat your meal until you reach your destination. Eating while driving is another form of distracted driving, and it can increase your risk of getting into an accident.

Map Your Route Ahead of Time

Trying to fiddle with a map or even a GPS device can distract your attention while driving and take your hand off the wheel, increasing your risk of an accident. Plan your route ahead of time by marking it clearly on a map or loading it up on a GPS before you leave.

Keep Your Car Well-Maintained

Engine problems, tire blowouts, and other malfunctions can cause potentially deadly accidents - especially if they happen at high speeds on the highway. Make sure your car is properly maintained by regularly checking the tires, belts, plugs, and fluids.

Make Sure You Are Well-Rested

Driving while you are sleep-impaired is almost as dangerous as driving while you are drunk. It reduces your response time and makes it harder for you to navigate safely on the road. Make sure you are well-rested each time you get behind the wheel, no matter how short the trip.

DrinkingandDriving_07222014Don't Drive While Impaired

Finally, it is important that you never drive while you are drunk or otherwise impaired. You present a real danger to yourself and other drivers when you drive while impaired. Always get a designated driver or hire a taxi if you are impaired.

Practicing these basic safe driving tips will help reduce your chances of being in an accident when you are on the road, keeping yourself and other drivers safe.

If you have been in an accident through no fault of your own, you may be entitled to compensation for your injuries. Call the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin at 1-866-900-7078 to find out if one of our North Carolina personal injury lawyers may be able to help you. Representatives are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to offer a free evaluation of your case.

Contact Information

Raleigh Law Office

5848-100 Faringdon Place
Raleigh, NC 27609
Phone: 919-834-1184
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Durham Law Office

280 South Mangum Street, Suite 400
Durham, NC 27701
Phone: 919-688-4991
Fax: 800-716-7881

Fayetteville Law Office

517 Owen Drive
Fayetteville, NC 28304
Phone: 910-488-0611
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Charlotte Law Office

1001 Morehead Square Drive, Suite 350
Charlotte, NC 28203
Phone: 704-599-1078
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

New Bern Law Office

1505 South Glenburnie Rd, Unit P
New Bern, NC 28562
Phone: 252-634-9010
Toll Free: 1-866-780-3422

Greenville Law Office

702 G Cromwell Dr.
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: 252-355-5205
Toll Free: 1-866-780-3227

Greensboro Law Office

300 N. Greene Street, Suite 850
Greensboro, North Carolina 27401
Phone: 336-665-7072
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Goldsboro Law Office

214 South William Street, Suite 3
Goldsboro, NC 27530
Phone: (919)-731-2581
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Henderson Law Office

514 Dabney Drive, Suite 200
Henderson, NC 27536
Phone: 252-492-4600
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Roanoke Rapids Law Office

709 Julian R. Allsbrook Highway
Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870
Phone: 252-537-9670
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Rocky Mount Law Office

3202 Sunset Avenue, Suite B
Rocky Mount, NC 27804
Phone: 252-937-4730
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Sanford Law Office

703-B South Horner Boulevard
Sanford, NC 27330
Phone: 919-775-1564
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Wilson Law Office

2315 Airport Blvd Suite A
Wilson, North Carolina 27896
Phone: 252-246-9090
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Winston-Salem Law Office

301 N. Main Street, Suite 2409-C
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078