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Contact the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin 1-866-900-7078

Have You Relaxed Car Seat Rules Now That Your Baby is Older? Don’t! Here’s Why.

While driving in to the Durham office, I saw something that irritates me even more than texting while driving. A woman (I assumed she was a mom) had her little girl, who could not have been more than 5 or 6, in the front seat of her Beamer traveling down a very busy four-lane road.  Without a car seat. Seriously? I wanted to shout out:

“HEY MOM! DID YOU KNOW YOUR CHILD IS 24X MORE LIKELY TO DIE IN A CAR ACCIDENT IF NOT PROPERLY RESTRAINED?

(Sorry for shouting in all caps. But I get worked up every time I think about it.)

If she had my job as a personal injury lawyer she’d think twice about her irresponsible, reckless, and potentially life-threatening decision.

We have represented far too many forever broken families whose children have died or been paralyzed or brain damaged as the result of car accidents. It can happen in a split second. And often it can be preventable.

“Just going down the street…”

Too often, parents might tend to loosen the rules a bit if they’re just going down the street. What some may not realize is that more kids get hurt when parents are running routine errands like going to daycare or the grocery store – or carpooling to school – than are injured on longer road trips. Safekids.org reports that 75% of car crashes affecting children happen within 25 miles of home. And 60% of crashes occur on roads with posted speed limits of 40 mph or less.

Many accidents and some child deaths happen at speeds of less than 25 MPH.

Children are not fully developed physically and are less able to withstand the impact of a car crash, compared with an adult. According to research conducted by the Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania, because air bags (and seat belts) were designed to protect average-sized adult males and NOT children, they can be extremely dangerous to infants or young children seated in front of them. Moreover, they report that children exposed to air bags during a crash are twice as likely to suffer a serious injury. Many people may be surprised to learn that a crash of less than 30 MPH can cause severe harm or death to a child as a result of airbag deployment. Why?

The technology used to deploy airbags is similar to the technology in some rocket boosters!

Keeping North Carolina’s Young Children Safer in the Car

Because of the position of airbags, children under 13 are safest when placed in the back seat, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Never place an infant in a rear-facing child safety seat in the front seat with an air bag. In a crash, the air bag comes out of the dashboard with its force directed at the back of the infant's head if riding in the front passenger seat.

Kids need to be in a rear-facing car seat until they’re 2 years old. A 2007 study in the journal Injury Prevention showed that children under age 2 are 75% less likely to die or be severely injured in a crash if they are riding rear-facing in the back seat. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advises parents to keep their toddlers in rear-facing car seats until age 2, or until they reach the maximum height and weight for their seat.

Keep most kids in a belt-positioning booster seat until they are 4 feet 9 inches tall and are between 8 and 12 years old, says the AAP. Only 20% of parents put children ages four to eight in booster seats, even though safety experts recommend it. The result of this is that kids between the ages of four and eight actually face a bigger risk of dying in a car accident than a child under the age of three, according to an article in parents.com.

If you don’t have enough room in the back of your car to safely transport the number of children who need to travel safely, visit a car seat check station in your area (typically the local police or fire station) where a trained expert will help evaluate your situation. Click here for Safekids.org safety check stations in North Carolina from Dare County in the Outer Banks to Cherokee County to the west.

5 Car Safety Tips for Kids 13 and Up

(That includes your college-aged “kids” and even you.)

  1. Move the front seat as far back as possible from the dashboard.
  2. Passengers 13 and up need to wear a lap and shoulder belt when riding in the front seat. Air bags are designed to work with the lap and shoulder belt to protect the occupant.
  3. Teach your child not to lean forward to change the radio station, insert CDs, or plug in their phones.
  4. Insist your child sit upright against the seatback, with the seat belt snug at all times.
  5. Find out what you need to know about air bags when buying a used car. Some, such as Takata have been recalled on thousands of vehicles.

We’re lawyers, but we’re parents too. It is beyond heartbreaking when we have to represent a mom and dad who has lost a child in a car crash, no matter what age or circumstances. I am adamant about safety rules in the car (especially teens texting and driving). Maybe it’s because of the brokenness I have seen as a lawyer – brokenness that didn’t have to happen. And it can happen just like that.

Get a FREE Case Evaluation from NC Car Crash Lawyers

We have represented far too many clients with children injured in car crashes. Their stories are heartbreaking. If your child or anyone in your family was injured in a car wreck, please have them contact us immediately or call 1-866-900-7078. We are available 24/7 and will evaluate the situation for FREE.

A Must-Read If You Want to Avoid Insurance Mistakes After an Accident

Who wouldn’t trust khaki-wearing Jake-from-State-Farm to be there for us, even at 3 in the morning? And good ol’ Flo from Progressive. You can trust her too – she’s like your quirky bestie. You can tell her anything.  AllState deep-voice guy? He’s not going to let anyone or anything mess with you. You’re in good hands.

Or are you?

Based on our experience? Not necessarily. There’s a reason why insurance companies spend so much money every year on “trust us” advertising.

Free Book on Avoiding Common Insurance Company Pitfalls

When you’re in an accident and you make a claim, why wouldn’t you think twice about giving one of these or any insurance company a recorded statement over the phone?

Why wouldn’t they believe you when you explain that you swerved into oncoming traffic because of a deer, and the car wreck was unavoidable and not your fault. And why wouldn’t they want to pay for all your medical bills caused by the accident, and time off work, or give you what your totaled car may really be worth?

Why would your insurance company try to low-ball you?

Because most insurance companies operate for profit. Theirs. And based on our years of experience of recovering more than $700 million in total* for over 30,000 clients they can’t be trusted to put your financial interests ahead of theirs.

Why do you think their ads emphasize the trust factor?

While many insurance company ads are admittedly enjoyable, dealing with insurance companies when you’ve been injured in a car crash – not so much.

That is why we developed a FREE 40-page Personal Injury Guide (How to take control of your personal injury claim, before it controls you). It’s a booklet we believe will help you try to avoid common pitfalls the insurance companies don’t want you to know about.

“No one should go through the personal injury process alone. If we can’t help, maybe this booklet will.”— Attorney and Shareholder, Michael Jordan

How to Deal With Your Insurance Company After a Car Wreck

Our book outlines some of the most common traps people fall into when trying to handle claims on their own, such as giving a recorded statement over the phone, not getting proper medical care for injuries, not pursuing all available coverage, even signing the wrong documents, and many other little-known traps the unwary can fall into.

The information highlighting common pitfalls, however, is just the beginning, covering just one chapter in our comprehensive guide. We know that when some people are injured in an accident, they may prefer to deal with the insurance company themselves instead of hiring a lawyer. We get it. Not every situation warrants legal help.

How to Understand Your Rights and Potential Barriers

That is why we created this easy-to-read guide. We wanted to help you try to understand your rights, the legal process, and potential barriers you may face after an injury in North Carolina. In the words of the guide’s author, attorney and shareholder Michael Jordan, “No one should go through the personal injury process alone. If we can’t help, maybe this booklet will.”

From the basics of the first things you should do after an injury, to dealing with specific injury types, to DWI victims’ rights, and even premises liability, we’ve tried to make this guide a key go-to resource for many different types of situations general and specific.

We’re Just As Available As Jake – (And We Won’t Raise Your Rates)

There’s a reason you’re reading this. If you have been injured, and if you find yourself falling into some of these common pitfalls the guide warns you about, contact us or call 1-866-900-7078.

We’re available at 3 in the morning too, just like Jake-from-State-Farm.

* Each case is unique and must be evaluated on its own merits. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

 

St. Pat’s Day Parades, Plus Sober Ride Services

If you live near Charlotte or Pinehurst, here are links to the info you need on for St. Patrick's Day Parades in those areas.

North Carolina St. Patrick's Day Parades

Uptown Charlotte
Saturday, March 18 at 10 a.m.

The Village of Pinehurst
Saturday, March 18 at 11 a.m.

St. Patrick's Day Among Deadliest for Alcohol-Related Crashes

While St. Patrick's Day parades have offered fun and entertainment for all ages in year's past, it's a day of binge drinking for many. According to Wallethub, 75% of fatal drunk driving car crashes on St. Patrick's Day involve a driver who has consumed more than 2X the legal alcohol limit. The legal limit in NC is 0.08.

St. Patrick's Day is among the deadliest for alcohol-related crashes.

A National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) study found that alcohol-related crashes claimed a life every 51 minutes on St. Patrick's Day in 2010, accounting for 32% of all fatalities that occurred that day.

NC Sober Ride Services Take You and Your Car Home

We don't want to rain on anyone's St. Patrick's Day parade. We just want you to be safe getting to and from them (or any other event).

If you plan to drink, don't drive. If you plan to drive, don't drink. Designate a driver.

There are many services across North Carolina that offer designated rides home, and their rates are comparable to taxis, even cheaper in some cases. Whatever the cost, it's cheaper than a DWI or worse - hospital bills and a lawsuit.

Click here for a list of North Carolina's sober ride services in Charlotte, Raleigh, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point, and Fayetteville and their surrounding communities and towns.

These services take you and your car home.

There's also Uber and Lyft in addition to local taxi services. Not only can they take you home, but you could take them to the parade and avoid any parking issues - or having to deal with other drivers who may have had one too many Guinness.

Get FREE Advice From NC Car Wreck Attorneys

Whatever you do and no matter where you are in North Carolina during St. Patrick's Day, we hope this information is helpful in your efforts to safely celebrate it. If you or someone you love was injured in a car wreck, whether or not it involved a drunk driver, contact an experienced car wreck lawyer.

Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer to represent them received 3.5X more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own*.

Contact us now for a free case evaluation to see if we can help or call us at 1-866-900-7078.

* Insurance Research Council 1999

Anti-Distracted Driving Apps Your Teen WILL WANT on Their Phone

I'm a dad.

Of teenagers.

I help out in my church with teen youth groups. And despite what my teens believe, I actually was a teenager at one time back when dinosaurs roamed the earth.

The teen years represent that magic threshold (some would say precipice) of adulthood. It reminds me of the toddler years when they discover new freedoms like walking (falling) and unearthing new things to put in their mouths like watch batteries and loose change. The difference is you were usually around to try to avert the really bad stuff from happening.

With teenagers?

You can't ride shotgun forever.

So when I read on Cars.com that half of all teen drivers will be involved in a crash before graduating from high school I did what any good parent of a teen driver would do.

I panicked.

Teens are notorious for being accident prone behind the wheel.

Especially younger teen drivers. Esurance.com says 16-year-old drivers are more than 2.5 times more likely to be in a crash than drivers ages 20 to 24. It gets worse when teens are carrying passengers. They report that the likelihood of teen driver death increases with each additional teenage passenger.  And, unfortunately, I get calls with that exact scenario far too often. Those are the cases that truly make me cry.  And then I spend some extra time with my kids.

Distracted Driving Apps Might Help Curb Teen Car Accidents and Deaths

Smartphones have put the world at our fingertips - particularly our social world. And that's hard for teens to ignore. That ping you hear which signals you to reach for your phone? It's addicting. Physiologically addicting. Read this fascinating blog to find out why our brains will not allow us to ignore the ping.

New distracted driving apps can help us ignore the ping.

By incentivizing safe driving, or even directly blocking you from using your phone while driving, these apps can help keep your attention on the road instead of the phone. According to DMV.org, these apps offer safety features that can:

  • Mute text alerts
  • Send calls to voicemail
  • Send auto-replies via text that the person is driving and cannot respond
  • Some will even send alerts to parents

I admit that as a parent, I sometimes get frustrated if my kids don't answer my calls, especially when I don't know they are driving.  But I'd rather them get to their destination safely and then respond rather than try to answer and wreck on the way.

With numerous apps that can help curb distracted driving, we cannot review them all. Here are some which offer more (and more interesting) ways to cut distracted driving than simply a locked phone.

Get FREE Cash and Incentives for Not Texting While Driving

PADD (People Against Distracted Driving) has approved two unique apps that offer positive reinforcement to ignore your phone while driving.

Drive BeeHive is a unique peer-to-peer app. You pair with a sponsor to earn rewards points for not using your phone while driving. It is enabled when the driver opens Drive BeeHive and begins driving. A lock screen appears and will count the driver's "safe miles." All it takes to earn those miles for that trip is to not use the phone behind the wheel. If you do, your miles are reset back to zero. Once the driver reaches their goal, their sponsor will be notified to release their reward. PADD is working with consumer sponsors to offer actual rewards in the form of discounts, coupons, and freebies.

AT&T DriveMode is also piggybacking on the positive incentive wave. This app allows you to set up your own prizes for a private group of drivers or for the public. The device works by blocking any phone calls or texting and driving. DriveMode can be set up to automatically start when you are driving over 15 MPH. You can even have it notify you when your teen driver has the app deactivated or if certain settings are changed.

Distracted Driving Apps That Track Driving Habits

Remember when your driver's ed instructor would ding you for making "jack rabbit starts and stops"? You got dinged a few times and eventually learned how to start and stop smoothly. Some apps can now reinforce this in your teen (or any) driver.

Consumer Reports favorably reviewed the Cellcontrol DriveID. It can record braking, acceleration, speed, cornering, and key driving events showing the scores on the app for the driver - or the driver's parents - to view. This Bluetooth technology device attaches under your rearview mirror and pairs their app with your cell phone to help curb impulses to check, chat, or text. Your phone screen goes into screen-lock mode when the car starts moving, and only 911 or designated phone numbers are accessible. This technology also has the capability to rate driving patterns and phone usage on a scoring system.

Apps That Alert Others When You're Driving

The Wonder app empowers not only the driver, but also people who may try to text or call the driver, to make the decision not to contact them while driving. By viewing a red or green dot, contacts within the app will know that you are driving before texting or calling. One downside, Wonder only works if all parties involved have the app.

There are dozens of other apps you can check out yourself, including Sprint's Drive First, T-Mobile's DriveSmart, and Verizon's Driving Mode, among others. Many of these and other apps are free.

Get FREE Advice From NC Car Wreck Attorneys

Whether you download a distracted driving app or not, don't ignore the risks of distracted driving. We are all in this together and everyone's at risk. If you or someone you love was injured in a car wreck, whether or not it involved a distracted driver, contact an experienced car wreck lawyer.

Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer to represent them received 3.5X more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own*.

Contact us now for a free case evaluation to see if we can help or call us at 1-866-900-7078.

* Insurance Research Council 1999

 

The Top 6 Questions About Medical Care after Car Accidents (Answered by a Nurse-Attorney)

Medical care after an accident is important. Important enough for us to find and hire an attorney who's also a Johns Hopkins-trained registered nurse.

Attorney Naa Atsoi Adu-Antoh leads our firm's medical review team. This team, we believe, is fundamentally important in our efforts to try to provide clients added value by offering the unique perspective of a highly trained and experienced medical professional who analyzes clients' medical issues within the context of their legal cases.

Attorney Adu-Antoh is a valued resource on a wide variety of medical issues and often our "go to" professional when we have a hunch there might be that needle in a haystack hidden in a client's medical files.

Q&A With Johns Hopkins Registered Nurse & Attorney Adu-Antoh

We thought it would be worthwhile to sit down with Attorney Adu-Antoh and ask her some of the questions our clients often have about how their medical treatment can affect their case.

Here are 6 of the most common questions she hears.

1. Why do I need to seek immediate medical care after an injury? What if I don't feel much pain?

I believe there are two important reasons.

First, you should have a medical professional evaluate you to see if there are any potential issues you may not be aware of.

Second, you want to make sure a licensed physician documents your injuries immediately after an accident. If your condition worsens and you have to make a medical claim, this initial documentation is largely what insurance companies use to determine the extent of your injuries. It is very important.

When you're in a car accident there's a lot going on in your body, and sometimes you may not feel pain right away - especially with soft tissue injuries, like whiplash. Your body is reacting on adrenaline, and adrenaline helps keep pain away - for a while. Your brain activity tends to focus on other things rather than your pain. You may be thinking, "I have to get to the day care to pick up my daughter before it closes," or "I have to be at that 9:00 presentation at work."

Or maybe you're like many of us and are just too busy to go to the doctor for what you think is just a bruised knee. That bruised knee could turn into something else when you start overcompensating for it.

And sometimes the pain may not seem like much at first. Maybe a 1 on a scale of 10. But the moment you feel pain or discomfort, that's a red flag. It's your body's way of telling you something is off. Something is wrong. You hurt something in your body. You may not feel any pain right away, but it can kick in later. Maybe even one or two days later.

The longer you wait to go to the doctor about your pain, the more you could be hurting your recovery and your legal case.

2. Why is it so important what I tell the treating doctor?

Whatever you tell the doctor is what they will write in your records.

You need to be specific and focus on your present injuries and exactly where you feel pain. Is your knee making a clicking or popping sound? Is there a dull ache or a stabbing burning pain? Does it give out? What is your pain level on a scale of 1 to 10? Don't try to "tough it out" and minimize your pain to the doctor. This information is what the doctor will use to determine your diagnosis and the treatment he thinks will help you recover. It is your responsibility to tell the doctor what you are feeling.

This is also the information the insurance company will pay very careful attention to. I've been doing this long enough to know some insurance companies may look for something from your records that they can use to try to minimize payment. And based on my experience, that initial meeting with your doctor is where they have tended to focus their efforts.

Be honest, but don't volunteer unnecessary information. What you say in your first few evaluations actually can count more than what you say seven months later. The insurance company may go back to the first day when you said "I have a little bit of pain." You know your mind was on something else - picking up your daughter or getting to that meeting, and you didn't even think of what you were saying. Regardless, the insurance company may use it anyway. I've seen this happen.

3. Why do I need to keep up consistent medical care?

Whether you were injured in a car wreck, hurt on the job, or have a Social Security Disability claim, one of the most important things you can do to help your case is keep up your medical care. Doing this will not only put you on the path to recovery, but you will have legitimate and accepted documentation that you are injured and undergoing treatment for your injuries.

Medical treatment is what helps bring value to your case. We rely on your treatments, medical records, and medical bills to help give value to your claim. If you don't have medical bills because you have not been to your treatments, that makes your claim all the more difficult.

The things we try to collect for are medical expenses, lost wages, and sometimes pain and suffering. But the majority comes from medical treatments. That is one of the reasons people come to us for help. They can't pay their medical bills after a car wreck or work injury. Your medical records show the issues you suffered and how much you paid for treatment.

If a doctor prescribes treatment for any length of time and you don't abide by your doctor's orders, the insurance company may view this as negligence on your part and possibly claim you are impeding the healing process. And they may not want to pay you as much or at all.

4. Why can't I see my chiropractor first if I only have a soft tissue injury, like whiplash?

If you are severely injured you should go directly to the ER. Otherwise, go to your primary care doctor immediately. Urgent care would be a last resort just because they don't know your history and they generally don't treat patients long term.

For a variety of reasons you want to make sure you initially see a licensed medical provider, such as your primary care doctor, a physician's assistant, a nurse practitioner, or other licensed medical providers of this nature.

First, a primary care provider can prescribe you medicine for pain and inflammation, etc.

Second, as I mentioned earlier, your primary care provider will evaluate you, determine what they think is wrong, and develop a treatment plan to help you recover. That may or may not involve going to a chiropractor for adjustments. The doctor may feel your recovery plan should involve physical therapy instead of chiropractic treatment. But it is your treating doctor who should be the one managing and monitoring you and your treatment plan with any other medical professionals.

Finally, records from a primary care provider who has prescribed a sound treatment plan tend to hold more weight with the insurance companies than injured patients who self diagnose or come up with their own recovery plan. In the insurance company's eyes, having a medical doctor advising you carries more weight and can potentially help your case.

5. Why can't I be in charge of my own medical treatment plan?

From the insurance company's perspective, having a licensed physician at the helm of your overall treatment plan is the best course of action for your recovery. It is the most credible evidence we can present to try to get them to pay your medical bills. Plus, a doctor should know what is best to help you try to get back to the state you were in before your injury.

Because we have dealt with insurance companies for so long, we know what they need to possibly pay your claims.

6. Why is my lawyer and paralegal so concerned with my medical care?

We act as our clients' advocate in so many ways. Without someone advocating for your medical treatments with the goal of helping you get better and trying to get compensation from the insurance company for you, we have seen some unfortunate situations.

Let me tell you a story.

We had a client come to us complaining of back, hip, and pelvic pain after a car accident. Our client had already been seeing a doctor who previously ordered an MRI of his back and hip.

For some reason, our client went back to the doctor's office just prior to the MRI and saw the physician's assistant (PA). (It is generally ordinary procedure to see the PA after the doctor has evaluated you first.) We don't know what transpired during that visit, but whatever it was led the PA to cancel the MRI. Our client went back and forth in pain, seeing the PA for months.

When he hired us, we looked hard through all his medical records back to day one. We finally uncovered that the doctor had never given him an official diagnosis! That is very likely why he ordered the MRI - it would have potentially given the doctor an image of where the injury had occurred and what the client's treatment plan might have been going forward. He had been treating for back pain all this time, yet he was having hip and pelvic pain. That test could have been the lynchpin our client needed to show the insurance company why he kept going back and forth to the doctor for all those months, and the documentation he needed to get them to pay for his medical bills.

Our first concern was, how are we going to try to help our client get better? If we try to get the doctor to order an MRI months later, insurance is not going to pay for it because there was no initial diagnosis! And this poor man had no health insurance. Without an MRI, how can we say his pain was from an injury he had sustained in the car accident that happened so long ago?

At the end of the day he did not get treatment he needed because he did not have someone like us, to advocate on his behalf from the beginning. By the time we stepped in to put all the puzzle pieces together, it was too late for him to get the MRI that could have helped show what was wrong. While we were able to collect from insurance*, sadly, he is still in pain.

It all goes back to initial communication, evaluation, and documentation from the doctor and having someone like a good lawyer advocate on your behalf sooner rather than later.

We do a lot of advocating here. A lot. Most people just don't realize how important these things are to their recovery efforts.

In my opinion, this is an area where I think our people have really added value above and beyond. As advocates, we are essentially helping to encourage you to communicate what is necessary, follow up, and try to keep all your appointments. And we collect all that documentation to show the insurance company the evidence and proof they may need to calculate a potential compensation amount.

At the end of the day it's hard to argue with well documented facts.

NC Personal Injury Lawyers Offer FREE Case Evaluation

If you've been injured in an accident and need an advocate in your corner, click here to ask someone if our firm may be able to help. Or call us at 1-866-900-7078.

 

* Cases or matters referenced do not represent the law firm's entire record. Each case is unique and must be evaluated on its own merits. The outcome of a particular case cannot be predicated upon a lawyer's or a law firm's past results. Client identity has been removed or changed to protect privacy.

How to Drive in the Snow in North Carolina (And Other Safety Tips for Wintry Road Conditions)

Nick says there could be up to six inches of snow the first weekend in January 2017. When the weatherman utters the S word, area neighbors look to Nick. He hasn't been wrong in years.

By the way, Nick is 12. And he's gotten it right every time since the ripe old age of 9. (We don't know how he does it!)

One thing Nick cannot tell us though is how to manage a two-ton vehicle as it is sliding sideways into another two-ton vehicle. Nick thinks that's cool. We don't.

There's a reason North Carolina's schools and businesses close at even the tiniest hint of snow in the forecast! With NC's topsy-turvy weather, snow often melts and refreezes, turning roads into ice-skating ponds that even our northern transplant drivers have trouble navigating.

And even if you're as experienced in winter-weather driving as Santa, keep in mind that may not be true for everyone else on the road. Here are some guidelines to go by when driving in winter weather.

Don't Underestimate Freezing Temperatures and Roads

Think...

  • Is my trip so urgent that I need to put myself and others in potential jeopardy?
  • Is my car prepared to handle the conditions I may face on the roads?
  • Is there another way for me to handle the task, or can I wait until conditions improve?

Preparing for Driving in the Snow

If you decide to travel out into the winter weather, the best way to keep yourself out of harm's way is to prepare yourself and your vehicle as best as possible.

  • Check weather conditions in advance.
  • Have communication Charge your cell phone in case you need to communicate with authorities or others (but don't communicate while driving). Let your friends and family know you will be going out and let them know when to expect you. Fill up your gas tank.
  • Test your heating and defrost Have your battery and antifreeze levels checked and don't forget to fill your windshield wiper levels. All that roadway salt and sand can obscure your vision quickly and often.
  • Check your brakes and make sure your tire pressure is inflated according to what the owner's manual suggests for driving in snow.
  • Check tire tread depth. Tires.com suggests you should have at least 5/32 of an inch tread to maintain good mobility on snowy roads. To easily check to see how much tread you have, place a quarter into several tread grooves across the tire. If part of Washington's head is covered by the tread, you have more than 4/32" of tread depth remaining.
  • Keep a winter emergency supply kit in your car. This can include a variety of things, from a blanket and gloves to a flashlight and batteries, or a candle to keep warm in case you get stranded, and cat litter, sand, or salt in case you get stuck. Click here for a list of other potential items.

Driving Safely in Snow and Ice

  • Excessive speed is the main cause of crashes during winter weather. Maintain a safe distance and drive slower than usual.
  • Clear as much snow and ice from your car as you can. And don't forget your headlights and tail lights and the roof of your car - you don't want snow blowing in your windshield or someone else's.
  • Drive smoothly and avoid sudden accelerating, braking, and turning.
  • Do not use your cruise control.
  • When driving over bridges and overpasses, be particularly careful. They ice up first since they're not connected to the soil and the ice may be hard to see. Don't apply brakes while on a bridge. The recent icy rain in Raleigh just a few weeks ago saw most of the accidents on bridges and overpasses.
  • When intersection traffic lights are not working, proceed as a four-way stop.

What to Do if Your Car Skids in Snow

  • Try to remain calm.
  • Don't brake unless you have to. Then brake gently.
  • Anti-lock brakes: apply steady gentle pressure
  • Standard non-ABS brakes: pump your brake pedal gently
  • Don't accelerate until your vehicle slows down enough to regain some traction with the road. Then gently accelerate.
  • In general, if you begin to slide, take your foot off the gas and turn the steering wheel in the direction of the slide. Braking will cause you to further lose control of your vehicle.
  • Rear-wheel skids. Turn the steering wheel in the direction your rear wheels are headed.
  • Front-wheel skids. Shift into neutral and don't try to steer immediately. When your vehicle begins to slow down, steer in the direction that you want your vehicle to go. Then, put the vehicle into gear and gently accelerate.

What to Do If Your Car Gets Stuck in the Snow

  • Pushing the gas pedal and spinning your tires will only dig you in deeper. Turn them from side to side to help clear snow, and then turn the steering wheel so the tires are as straight as possible.
  • Use a shovel to clear the snow in front of and behind your tires.
  • Spread cat litter, sand, or salt in the cleared areas around your drive wheels.
  • NCDOT suggests that you might try rocking the vehicle back and forth, but cautions you to check your owner's manual first; as some vehicle transmissions might be damaged by this. Shift from forward to reverse and back again, using a light touch on the gas pedal. Again, don't spin your wheels.

AAA offers very thorough tips which build on this information and so does the NCDOT. Click here to access the AAA page and here for NCDOT's website.

North Carolina Car Wreck Lawyers

If, despite Nick's prediction, you decide to venture out and you are injured by someone else in a car wreck, contact us.

  • Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer received 3.5 times1more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own.
  • We are one of the largest personal injury law firms in North Carolina and have vast resources to draw from.
  • We have recovered over $600 million2 total for more than 30,000 clients since 1997.
  • We have more than 150 staff members, including over 35 attorneys.
  • Several of our lawyers have achieved peer- and client-reviewed designations including Best Lawyers Best Lawyers in America 20173 and Lawyer of the Year 20174; Super Lawyers Rising Star 20165 and Super Lawyer 20166.

  See for yourself some of the things clients have to say about us.

Get a FREE Case Evaluation From North Carolina Lawyers

Contact us  or call 1-866-900-7078. We will evaluate your situation for FREE and let you know if we think we can help.

 

P.S. Click here if you want your teen driver to learn hands-on defensive driving techniques under simulated hazardous conditions. There's a non-profit organization in NC that offers instruction around NC and the U.S. It's free (donations) and taught by former race car drivers, police, professional stunt drivers, and other professional drivers.

 

 

1  Insurance Research Council 1999.

2  Each case is unique and must be evaluated on its own merits. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

3  Since it was first published in 1983, Best Lawyers® has become universally regarded as the definitive guide to legal excellence. Best Lawyers is based on an exhaustive peer-review survey. Over 52,000 leading attorneys cast more than 5.5 million votes on the legal abilities of other lawyers in their practice areas. Lawyers are not required or allowed to pay a fee to be listed; therefore inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a singular

4 Only a single lawyer in each practice area and designated metropolitan area is honored as the Lawyer of the Year, making this accolade particularly significant. Lawyers being honored as "Lawyer of the Year" are selected based on particularly impressive voting averages received during the exhaustive peer-review assessments conducted with thousands of leading lawyers each year. Receiving this designation reflects the high level of respect a lawyer has earned among other leading lawyers in the same communities and the same practice areas for their abilities, their professionalism, and their integrity. For information regarding standards for inclusion visit www.bestlawyers.com.

5 To be eligible for inclusion in Rising Stars, a candidate must be either 40 years old or younger or in practice for 10 years or less. Rising Stars undergo a rigorous, multiphase process which combines peer nominations with third-party research. Each candidate is evaluated on 12 indicators of peer recognition and professional achievement. Selections are made annually on a state-by-state basis. While up to 5% of the lawyers in any state are named "Super Lawyers," by Super Lawyers magazine, no more than 2.5% are named to the Rising Stars list. For information regarding standards for inclusion visit www.superlawyers.com.

6 Super Lawyers undergo a rigorous, multiphase process which combines peer nominations with third-party research. Each candidate is evaluated on 12 indicators of peer recognition and professional achievement. Selections are made annually on a state-by-state basis. For information regarding standards for inclusion visit www.superlawyers.com.

Am I in Danger of Being Deported If I’m in a Car Wreck But I Am Not a U.S. Citizen? (And 10 Other Things Undocumented People Want to Know)

Car accidents are terrifying. And sometimes they're even scarier if you're worried about discrimination or even fear being deported. We understand.

Don't let that fear cause you to make bad choices. If someone is negligent and injures you, you're supposed to be given the same care and respect as any U.S. citizen.

"Supposed to" is key. As a non-U.S. citizen, you may have to take extra steps to try to make sure you're treated fairly.

That's what this blog is about, but click here
if you want to skip reading and talk to someone right away.

 

Why You Have to Be Careful After an Accident If You're Not a U.S. Citizen

I and many of my James Scott Farrin colleagues do a lot of community work - particularly in the Spanish-speaking community. One question I hear a lot from our Latino neighbors is: "What should I do if I'm injured in a car accident but don't have papers or a driver's license?" They're understandably afraid.

North Carolina accident laws are designed to try to help protect anyone who is injured in the state - documented, undocumented, U.S. citizens, and citizens of other countries.

Yet sadly, oftentimes we see adversarial behavior toward our non-citizen clients, especially Latinos, by some insurance companies and others. We have seen some of them try to intimidate these clients just because they don't speak English, don't have a driver's license or proper documentation, or they're not a U.S. citizen.

The Insurance Company Believes You Won't Go to Court - Blatant Discrimination?

In our booklet Insurance Companies Behaving Badly, one employee recounted a story about an insurance adjuster who said they had a video contradicting what our client said about how she got her injuries. In mediation, we proved it wasn't our client on the video, but the defense continued to deny the claim.

In response, we launched discovery into the insurance company's treatment of Hispanic clients. They ended up settling the case for six figures*.

When you mess with our clients, you mess with us. We'll play hardball. We do not appreciate bad behavior.

My Best Advice: Get Free Advice from an Attorney

A large portion of the cases I resolve in any given year are for non-U.S. and undocumented residents. Every time I think I've seen it all, an insurance company will come along and surprise me again.

My advice when you're injured in an accident is to call an attorney right away. There are just too many ways insurance companies can affect your claim. Most attorneys will do an initial consultation for free, and if you ultimately choose to hire them you could potentially end up getting more for your claim.

Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer to represent them received 3.5x times more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own **.

And if you think you cannot afford an attorney, think again. At our firm, you pay nothing upfront. We work on a contingency basis, which means if we don't get you compensation, you don't pay any attorney's fees!

What to Do After an Accident If You Are Undocumented

When undocumented people call me after an accident and ask what to do, I tell them their initial steps are the same things anyone should do after an accident.

If you or someone else is injured, call 9-1-1. If your injury is serious, you may not have time to collect all the facts, and that's OK. Your health comes first.

Don't be Afraid to Report the Accident to the Police

In order to make a claim for your damages and your injuries, you must be able to prove the accident happened. You should call the police. Don't be afraid. The purpose of calling is so the responding police officer will conduct an investigation and make an official report of the accident.

Never trust the at fault driver to report it on his own. He may later deny the accident ever occurred. By then it will be too late to contact the police, and you could be stuck paying for the crash yourself.

Suppose I got a ticket for no U.S. driver's license? Will this affect my claim?

No. You should not ignore your ticket, as it may have other legal ramifications, but you may be entitled to compensation for your injuries and any damages to your vehicle, whether you have a license or not.

Will I be in danger of being deported if I have no drivers' license and make a claim?

Generally, you will not likely be deported simply because you make an insurance claim after an accident where you received a ticket for driving without a license.

Gather Facts

Get as much information as you can while you are still at the scene, or immediately thereafter. Write down:

  • Date and time of the accident
  • Location of the accident
  • Other driver's name and license plate number
  • Police report number
  • Investigating officer's name
  • Witnesses names and their contact information, including phone number

Take Pictures

With your cell phone, someone else's cell phone, or a camera, take pictures of:

  • All vehicles involved
  • Any property damaged by the wreck
  • Any visible injuries
  • Tire marks and debris in the roadway

Seek Medical Attention

Even if you feel fine, you should probably see a doctor. It's not uncommon for people feel fine in the minutes and hours immediately after a crash, when adrenaline is high. Many people don't start to feel the effects of a wreck until hours or even a few days later.

But if you don't see a doctor and something starts to feel worse, you won't have any documentation that your injuries are related to your accident and an insurance company may deny your claim.

 

10 Things Most Non-U.S. Citizens Want to Know After a Car Wreck

As I mentioned previously, a large number of my cases are non-citizens. Here are the top things most want to know.

1. I don't have health insurance, can I go to the doctor?

If you are injured, you should seek immediate medical attention. There are options for those without health insurance.

2. Will the adjuster send me to a doctor?

No, it is your responsibility to obtain medical treatment. The adjuster does not direct treatment, or work directly with any specific doctors.

3. My injuries seem minor; can I just wait and see if they go away?

While your injuries may seem minor, only a medical doctor can confirm this. Sometimes injuries left untreated become worse or even permanent. If you do not seek medical attention in a timely manner, the insurance company may try to deny compensation for your injuries and related medical bills.

4. My car is not drivable, how can I go to the doctor?

It is your responsibility to obtain medical treatment, with or without transportation. Ask a friend or family member to give you a ride or take the bus. If you don't get yourself to the doctor, you could prolong your pain. Without medical treatment, the insurance company will conclude you were not injured in the wreck, no matter how much pain you are feeling.

5. Should I call my insurance company?

Even if the accident is not your fault, you should contact your own insurance company to let them know you have been in a car wreck. You may have coverage available on your own policy that you can use without affecting your rates. If you are the owner of the vehicle involved in the crash, you should open a claim with the at-fault insurance company for your property damage. Do not go into detail about your injuries or treatment. It is enough to tell them you are injured and under a doctor's care.

It is not wise to sign anything without first speaking to an experienced attorney; you may be signing away your entire case!

6. The adjuster said he needs my Social Security number, but I don't have one. Can I still make a claim?

Yes, if you are injured in a car accident, you may have a right to compensation, regardless of your citizenship status.

7. The adjuster wants a recorded statement, should I give one?

Probably not. The insurance company knows how to protect their own interests. You may think there is no harm in telling your story, but liability laws are complicated and you could do irreparable damage to your case.

8. I am not fluent in English, how can I communicate with the adjuster?

Most insurance companies have Spanish-speaking staff, and if not, have translators available. Request to be contacted by a Spanish-speaking adjuster, or a translator.

9. The adjuster said the other driver has no insurance, what can I do?

There may be other types of coverage available to you to cover your losses. Inform your own insurance company the at-fault driver was uninsured.

10. The adjuster says he will pay for everything, so I don't need an attorney, right?

No! You have no guarantee the adjuster will pay even a portion of your bills. Often at the end of the case the adjuster will offer to pay only a few of your expenses. You should decide for yourself if you need an attorney in your case. Don't let the adjuster make this decision for you.

The insurance company has adjusters and attorneys working for them to make sure they come out on top. Sometimes an adjuster will give you misleading information, or try to scare you out of pursuing your rights. Each case is unique, and while you may not hire an attorney, it is a good idea to speak to an experienced attorney to discuss the nuances and issues or your particular case, and find out what your options are.

Get a FREE Case Evaluation by Experienced NC Car Crash Attorneys
We're always here for you to try to help you protect your rights - documented or undocumented. Contact us anytime for a FREE case evaluation or call at 1-866-900-7078.

We have both Spanish-speaking staff and attorneys available to help you.

 

*Cases or matters referenced do not represent the law firm's entire record. Each case is unique and must be evaluated on its own merits. The outcome of a particular case cannon be predicated upon a lawyer's or law firms past results. These are specific examples of experiences we have had with some insurance companies, adjusters, or others. These stories do not necessarily represent any industry as a whole. These descriptions of events are based upon the recollections of individual staff members. Client identities have been removed or changed to protect their privacy.

**Insurance Research Council, 1999

Road Rage Rages During the Holidays (Tips on How You Can Steer Clear)

For many North Carolina residents there's no avoiding travel during the holidays. Shopping. Visiting. Parties. And the usual commutes to work, kids' games and practices. Time is tight. People are stressed.

And road rage rages.

Just in the past couple of months:

A man pulled a gun on another driver while at Concord intersection during a road rage incident.

A Hoke County man was shot and killed when an enraged driver plowed into his car, pulled out a gun and shot him.

At UNC Greensboro two cars tried to block another car that was carrying a young passenger. One of the drivers pulled out a gun.

What in the world is going on?

I'll tell you what is going on.

More Stress + More Cars + Less Time = ROAD RAGE

People are stressed. Some are impaired by alcohol or drugs (including prescription drugs). Many are in a hurry. And some are just plain rude.

An article in Psychiatry MMC, published on the National Institutes of Health website, offers this:

"Up to one-third of community participants report being perpetrators of road rage, indicating that various forms of road rage are relatively commonplace. ...The most common offenders appear to be young and male. A number of factors may contribute to road rage, including environmental factors (e.g., greater number of miles driven per day, traffic density), nonspecific psychological factors (e.g., displaced aggression, attribution of blame to others), and ... alcohol and substance misuse. ... Some reasons include borderline and antisocial personality disorders."

Why Is Road Rage Higher During the Holidays?

Why is road rage on the rise during the holidays? We've been representing accident victims since 1997, and here's what we've observed:

  • Traffic. This one almost goes without saying: the more traffic, the more likely it is for drivers to get frustrated and angry. With tens of thousands of extra cars on the road, the holidays become a breeding ground for road rage, especially during peak travel and shopping times.
  • Unfamiliarity. Thanks to our mild climate in North Carolina, we see a lot of friends and relatives coming from out of state for the holidays. Unfortunately, that means there are many more drivers on the road who don't know our roads well.
  • Unsafe maneuvers. One reason out-of-state drivers are disproportionately likely to cause road rage accidents is that they may potentially make unsafe maneuvers because they are not familiar with the roads. And tailgating, switching lanes, and making turns without signaling can all lead to road rage. Even something as simple as slowing down to try to read street signs can trigger rage.
  • Shopping and parking. Parking lots are some of the most common places road rage can happen any time of year. When the holiday shopping season hits, the parking lots at the Tanger outlets in Mebane and even your local Walmart can become a mob scene. Too many cars vying for limited parking spaces can turn ugly fast.
  • Seasonal stress. The stress of coordinating guests and celebrations, shopping, planning, decorating and all of the other tasks that come with the holidays can lead to an increase in stress on the roads.
  • Celebrations. Motorists who go out of their way to enjoy the holidays may be at risk of road rage. Holiday parties can lead to late nights out, and lack of sleep can contribute to road rage. Likewise, drug and alcohol use can cause drivers to become aggressive and impatient with others.
  • Winter weather. Winters in North Carolina generally aren't bad, but we all remember the ice storm of January 2015. Even a little snow or sleet can contribute to road rage.

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) lists even more reasons you might find worth reading.

What to Do If You Are Confronted By an Enraged Driver

If you are confronted by an enraged driver, DMV.org suggests being the bigger person and showing remorse by:

  • Waving to the other driver
  • Mouthing that you're sorry
  • Allowing plenty of room for them to pass you
  • If it gets out of hand, call 911 as soon as it is safe to. And don't get out of your car if someone confronts you.

How to Keep Road Rage in Check

You can't control other drivers' behavior, but you can take steps to try to keep yourself safe from aggressive drivers. Here are a few ways to avoid being hurt in a road rage accident:

  • Make sure you're OK to drive. Be conscientious of whether you're too stressed, frustrated, or tired to get behind the wheel. If your safety is at risk, consider if those errands can wait.
  • Plan ahead. Just know there will be heavy traffic and give yourself enough time to get your tasks done. Plan your shopping trips and other errands before you leave home. If it's possible to arrange your schedule to go during off-peak hours, you'll be much safer.
  • Avoid distractions. Distracted driving can lead to missed green lights, failure to signal, and other maneuvers that could trigger road rage.
  • Stay calm, no matter what. If you witness road rage, the absolute safest thing you can do is not respond. Don't make eye contact, and certainly don't hit your horn, tailgate, or antagonize the other driver.

If you feel yourself getting stressed because of another driver, Psychology Today suggests you practice stress breathing in your car: inhale for a count of four, hold for count of four, exhale for a count of four, hold for a count of four, and repeat as many times as necessary to help bring your pulse rate and blood pressure back to normal levels.

The article goes on to suggest that you keep your perspective. You cannot control, coerce, or fix the other driver. But you can control you. Focus on being "relentlessly positive" and practice kindness, starting with you first.

Like my grandmother used to say, "You catch more flies with honey than vinegar."

Get a FREE Case Evaluation From North Carolina Car Wreck Lawyers

If you or someone you love has been injured by an aggressive driver in a road rage incident in North Carolina, contact us now for a free case evaluation or call us at 1-866-900-7078.

Holiday Party Hosts Better Watch Out - You Could Be Liable for Injuries Drunken Guests Cause. (10 Things You Need to Know)

If you plan on being the holiday host or hostess with the mostest this season, here's something you should know.

If your mostest includes alcohol and your guests overindulge, you could potentially be on the hook if they wreck their car and kill or injure someone. As a matter of fact, you could be held liable if they trip over a tree root while stumbling home and chip a tooth.

In North Carolina you can be held responsible for whatever happens to your drunken guests after they leave your party. If it's bad enough, you could find yourself ringing in the New Year with unwanted legal fees and court costs.

You might think your friend wouldn't sue you over their own drunken negligence. Perhaps not. But those they injure sure could - especially if they had a good North Carolina personal injury lawyer. If my client was seriously injured because of the negligence of another, I'd go after each and every negligent party I could find.

Whether it's a holiday party, Super Bowl party, or a back-yard brunch, you don't want to be held liable because your guest caused personal injury. I've seen these types of situations ruin lives in certain instances.

How Is a Party Host Liable in NC?

Liability extends to anyone who provides alcohol to guests. North Carolina law says that when an intoxicated guest causes an injury or accident, the injured person may be able to seek damages from the host if they:

  • Provided or served alcohol
  • Knew or even should have known the person served was drunk
  • Knew the person would be driving after drinking alcohol served at the party

Let's say, for example, you had a holiday open house at your new home in Winston-Salem. A guest who lives in Greensboro is among the first to arrive and the last to leave. You really haven't paid much attention to how many times you've refilled his glass. When he's ready to drive home, it doesn't occur to you that he may be impaired, because he seems coherent and alert. And besides, you assume that he's responsible enough to sober up before driving back to Greensboro. On his drive home he crosses over the center line of Route 421 at Willow Bend and crashes head on with a mini van carrying a young family. Thankfully no one is killed, but all of them sustained significant injuries. The driver was blinded by the airbag chemicals, the mom broke her back in three places, and one of the three children in the backseat sustained a severe concussion from which she will never recover.

Don't think for one minute that family isn't going to get a good North Carolina personal injury lawyer to try to sue him and you for everything they could possibly get. With all the medical bills they'll have to pay - and significant time out of work for mom and dad for their injuries - they'll need every penny that's potentially coming to them.

Do you really want that responsibility on your shoulders? Unless you have a whopping umbrella policy, you could possibly lose just about everything you own. Life for everyone - including you - will never be the same.

It's just not worth the risk.

If you're planning a holiday party this season, here's a list you'll want to check twice before your guests enjoy that first glass of holiday cheer.

10 Ways to Minimize Your Liability When Hosting a Holiday Party

  1. Consider using a professional bartender who is used to recognizing early signs of
  2. Serve food with proteins and fats which can help absorb the effects of alcohol.
  3. Offer a variety of soft drinks, coffee, tea, and water in addition to alcohol.
  4. Stop serving alcohol at least an hour before you expect guests to begin leaving.
  5. Have an Uber, Lyft, taxi number, or app handy or at least one or more designated driver services throughout North Carolina (some will even take the guest's car home). Why not provide a designated driver for them if your guests live close by?
  6. Ask one or two of your guests to monitor the crowd for potential problems and to take the initiative to offer rides to those who seem to need it.
  7. Make sure your guests know you want them to have fun, but to act responsibly.
  8. If you see a guest that's suspect, take their keys if you have to. (Remember friends don't let friends drive drunk.)
  9. Encourage your guests to wear their seatbelts while driving home. If they're involved in a car crash, they'll be better protected.
  10. Be open to overnight stays if an intoxicated guest cannot get a ride home. An air mattress is cheaper than a lawsuit.

Get a FREE Case Evaluation from NC Personal Injury Lawyers

If you or a loved one has been injured in a car accident as a result of a drunk driver - or any driver - contact us or call 1-866-900-7078.

 

P.S. Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer to represent them received 3.5X more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own*.

 

*Insurance Research Council, 1999.

Texting and Driving – Just as Addictive as Gambling or Drugs

We know better than to text, check Snapchat, like a Facebook post, or talk on the phone while driving.

We know better.

We've heard and read the heartbreaking stories of lives lost and ruined. But why do we do it anyway? For the same reason you can't eat just one potato chip. Or you "Gotta Catch 'Em All."

chipsDopamine, the Ping, and Addiction

Dopamine is partly to blame. It's the chemical reaction in your brain that leads to addiction. The ping of your cell phone creates the same arousal response that activates your brain's reward center. And it is a key transmitter in a highly complex chemical relationship that sometimes leads to addictive behaviors. Food. Gambling. Video gaming. Drugs and alcohol. Shopping.

And texting while driving.

When we hear the ping of a text message, social media update, or email, our brains get a hit of dopamine. Who's it from? Who liked my post? What am I missing out on if I don't read this? Experts are learning that this initial hit, interestingly, can lead to a higher rush of dopamine than reading the message itself. And it's not just with cell phones. The internet can also prompt addictive behavior.

"Ha Ha. Made Ya Look!"

Dopamine is a large part of the reason we are drawn to the urge to give in to a pleasurable experience. And you can't stop the dopamine reaction any more than you can stop adrenaline from making you jump when startled. It's autonomic. It's primal. It's how we are wired. And some scientists say it's much of the reason why our species has survived for millennia. Food equals life. Sex equals the procreation of mankind.

We humans are wired to want to give in to our pleasures and primal urges. And that, some researchers say, is why we have a very hard time ignoring the ping of a cell phone when we are maneuvering a two-ton vehicle at 65 miles per hour through three lanes of heavy traffic with our toddler in the back seat.

That ping elicits the same dopamine response as the potato chip you just have to have, or the slot machine lever you are compelled to pull for the umpteenth time. It makes you want to look.

How Cell Phones Are Similar to Slot Machines

David Greenfield, founder of the Center for Internet and Technology Addiction and the research source behind AT&T's "It Can Wait" campaign calls the smartphone the "smallest slot machine in the world."

He compares the variable reinforcement of a text, email or social media hit to a slot machine's potential rewards. You don't know when you'll get it. You don't know what you'll get. And you don't know how good it will be. It's the anticipation that generates the high.

In addition to the dopamine surge, there's something else working against us in a different part of our brain, he explained in a CNN interview. The dopamine reaction causes a partial shut-down of our prefrontal cortex - where most of our judgment and reasoning occurs.

So now, we have two areas of our brain working against us as we hurtle down I-95 dodging other smartphone addicts. We have the dopamine devil urging us to "take a quick peek," while our inner voice of reason, which should be slapping our hand, is instead rendered mute.

And most experts agree that the prefrontal reasoning center is not fully developed until around age 25, which explains why the situation is even worse with teens and twentysomethings. (Incidentally, car insurance companies figured this out long ago. Think of what age insurance rates generally drop: 25!)

This texting and driving epidemic is starting to make more sense now isn't it?

While this chemistry lesson is quite fascinating, what can we do to stop this behavior the very next time we get behind the wheel?

EndDD.org reports that over 90% percent of drivers know cell phone distractions are dangerous and find it "unacceptable" to text or e-mail while driving. Yet, 35% of them do it anyway.

4 Easy Ways to Stop Using a Cell Phone While Driving

  1. Turn your phone on silent
  2. Completely turn your phone off
  3. Put your cell out of reach (in the trunk, glove box, or in a purse in the back seat)
  4. Download one of the many apps that helps prevent you from texting while driving (most are free). Some will silence notifications and message people trying to reach you that you are driving.

And by all means, if you are texting someone that you know is driving, stop texting them! If for no other reason, you could be liable for damages if that driver causes an accident because of your text. Some states are currently considering legislation of this nature.

Get a FREE Case Evaluation from NC Personal Injury Lawyers

We have represented far too many clients who were injured - some severely - by distracted drivers. The stories are heartbreaking, and sadly, most could have been prevented.

If you or someone you know was injured by a distracted driver, please have them contact us  or call 1-866-900-7078. We are available 24/7 and will evaluate the situation for FREE and let you know if we think we can help.

P.S. Click here if you want your teen driver to learn what it's really like to drive distracted (but experience it in the safety of a simulated environment). The non-profit Charlotte-based B.R.A.K.E.S (Be Responsible and Keep Everyone Safe) offers defensive maneuvering instruction around N.C. and the U.S. Students are taught by former race car drivers, policemen, and other professional drivers.

Contact Information

Raleigh Law Office

5848-100 Faringdon Place
Raleigh, NC 27609
Phone: 919-834-1184
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Durham Law Office

280 South Mangum Street, Suite 400
Durham, NC 27701
Phone: 919-688-4991
Fax: 800-716-7881

Fayetteville Law Office

517 Owen Drive
Fayetteville, NC 28304
Phone: 910-488-0611
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Charlotte Law Office

201 McCullough Drive, Suite 220
Charlotte, NC 28262
Phone: 704-599-1078
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

New Bern Law Office

1505 South Glenburnie Rd, Unit P
New Bern, NC 28562
Phone: 252-634-9010
Toll Free: 1-866-780-3422

Greenville Law Office

702 G Cromwell Dr.
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: 252-355-5205
Toll Free: 1-866-780-3227

Greensboro Law Office

300 N. Greene Street, Suite 850
Greensboro, North Carolina 27401
Phone: 336-665-7072
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Goldsboro Law Office

214 South William Street, Suite 3
Goldsboro, NC 27530
Phone: (919)-731-2581
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Henderson Law Office

514 Dabney Drive, Suite 200
Henderson, NC 27536
Phone: 252-492-4600
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Roanoke Rapids Law Office

709 Julian R. Allsbrook Highway
Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870
Phone: 252-537-9670
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Rocky Mount Law Office

3202 Sunset Avenue, Suite B
Rocky Mount, NC 27804
Phone: 252-937-4730
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Sanford Law Office

703-B South Horner Boulevard
Sanford, NC 27330
Phone: 919-775-1564
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Wilson Law Office

2315 Airport Blvd Suite A
Wilson, North Carolina 27896
Phone: 252-246-9090
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Winston-Salem Law Office

301 N. Main Street, Suite 2409-C
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078