Personal Injury Lawyer
Office Locations
Contact the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin
1-866-900-7078
Contact the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin 1-866-900-7078

The Top 4 Ways People Die at Work in North Carolina (and How to Avoid Them)

More people died at work this past year than in any of the past four years. It's a sad, but true fact.

If you've lost a loved one in an at-work accident, please click here to talk to someone immediately who can help advocate for you.

According to the North Carolina Department of Labor, workplace fatalities in 2016 (federal fiscal year) are higher than they've been since 2012. A total of 48 people lost their lives, primarily in construction and manufacturing.

The 4 Most Common Reasons People Die at Work (in NC)

In an effort to curb workplace deaths, the North Carolina Department of Labor identified the following four accident categories that caused the most work-related deaths (89%) in North Carolina from 2009 - 2015. These were in large part construction-type jobs.

  1. Falls From Elevations

    Nearly half of all these "Big 4" fatalities were falls. Electricians, construction workers, firefighters - anyone whose job involves using a ladder or working at great heights can be susceptible to deadly falls.Many are preventable. A worker in Carteret was not secured onto the roof when he bent over, lost his balance, and fell 50 feet below onto concrete. Other falls are just very unlucky. One victim from Person County fell through a tin roof and landed on a vertical rod protruding from a table. The Centers for Disease Control recommends keeping work spaces free of clutter that could trip someone and cause a fall, making sure edges are protected, and checking all ladders or work surfaces for stability and proper positioning before applying weight.
  1. Struck-By Events
    Although the Department of Labor does not count car accidents among their work fatality numbers (such as a truck driver who dies in a crash), they do count when a vehicle strikes someone outside of a vehicle - such as someone working on a highway construction site.Other struck-by events can include those who were killed by something falling on them or being hit by a type of machinery.

    More than a third of the at-work deaths in North Carolina in 2016 were struck-by events, which are largely preventable.

    In an interview with WRAL-TV, Division of Occupational Safety and Health Division Director Allen McNeely said, "All of us - safety professionals employers and employees - must do better in identifying struck-by hazards... Staying vigilant around heavy machinery and construction material is critical."
  1. Caught In or Between Objects or MachineryThis category traditionally includes being caught in agricultural or manufacturing machinery, but may also include trench or excavation collapses and cave-ins. In fact, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 90% of their safety citations involve excavations. Even something as seemingly simple as laying pipework near a roadway can turn deadly in a split second, as it did for one Rocky Mount worker who was laying pipe near a pond in August when the ground collapsed, trapping, and killing him.The agency says that cave-ins are the most deadly of any type of excavation-type job. Again, safety and precautions are emphasized. They recommend having protective systems in place and inspecting trenches every day. Sadly, the Rocky Mount worker was unprotected.

    For other kinds of caught-in accidents, it is imperative to be diligent about safety training. ABC Eyewitness News in Gastonia County reported on the tragedy of a 19-year-old young man who suffered an unthinkable death when he was pulled into a wood cutter. It was his first day on the job. The owner of the business was so distraught he suffered a heart attack.

    Safety is everyone's responsibility. Be mindful of things like lose clothing and hair that could get caught in a machine. When around machinery, whether conducting maintenance or when it's not in use, make sure it is turned off and any wheels are blocked.

  1. ElectrocutionsWhile electrocutions can happen anywhere an electrical current is tampered with, those that prove fatal often involve power lines. Crane operators and people working on scaffolds near power lines must be especially careful.In general, assume all lines are energized unless verified otherwise, keep yourself and all equipment at a safe distance, and use a spotter and warning devices to avoid getting too close.

Temporary Workers Are Most Vulnerable to Fatalities on the Job

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health cites a report by the Labor Relations and Research Center at the University of Massachusetts indicating that 90% percent of U.S. businesses utilize temporary labor.

The report claims that temps sometimes receive insufficient training or are inexperienced in protecting themselves on the jobsite. Yet they are reluctant to ask employers for help because they fear they could be replaced. Moreover, temporary workers tend to be younger, less educated, and disproportionally consist of minority workers, many of whom might be immigrant workers.

Why are temps at higher risk for job injuries and fatalities?

"There's little incentive for host employers to rigorously train and supervise temp workers because staffing agencies carry their [workers'] comp insurance. If an agency has a high number of injuries within its workforce, they - not the host employer - are penalized with higher premiums," a recent Center for Public Integrity feature on the plight of temporary workers reported.

Further, there's little monetary accountability. The Occupational Safety and Health Act limits negligent employers to a maximum fine of $7,000 per safety violation deemed "serious" - even if the violations cause death.

That fine amounts to little more than a finger wagging for many employers.

If a Loved One Died at Work

No matter how careful we try to be, sometimes accidents happen. If you've lost someone, you have our deepest sympathies. You're the reason we do the work that we do. Click here for helpful resources that we believe might be of some help in your time of grief.

You should know there are many workers' compensation benefits surviving family members may qualify for. But don't rely on your loved one's employer or workers' comp insurance company to make sure you get everything you may be entitled to.

Regrettably, even in a time of loss, we've seen insurance companies turn their backs - or try to.

NC Workers' Comp Lawyers Offer FREE Case Evaluation

If someone died at work we are here to try to advocate for you. Our experienced team is dedicated to fighting for justice and trying to get surviving family members the benefits they may deserve. Let one of our workers' comp attorneys - seven of whom are North Carolina Board Certified Specialists in Workers' Compensation Law - evaluate your situation for free.

We are here to listen to what you are going through and see if we can help get you the answers you need. Contact us or call 1-866-900-7078.

Anti-Distracted Driving Apps Your Teen WILL WANT on Their Phone

I'm a dad.

Of teenagers.

I help out in my church with teen youth groups. And despite what my teens believe, I actually was a teenager at one time back when dinosaurs roamed the earth.

The teen years represent that magic threshold (some would say precipice) of adulthood. It reminds me of the toddler years when they discover new freedoms like walking (falling) and unearthing new things to put in their mouths like watch batteries and loose change. The difference is you were usually around to try to avert the really bad stuff from happening.

With teenagers?

You can't ride shotgun forever.

So when I read on Cars.com that half of all teen drivers will be involved in a crash before graduating from high school I did what any good parent of a teen driver would do.

I panicked.

Teens are notorious for being accident prone behind the wheel.

Especially younger teen drivers. Esurance.com says 16-year-old drivers are more than 2.5 times more likely to be in a crash than drivers ages 20 to 24. It gets worse when teens are carrying passengers. They report that the likelihood of teen driver death increases with each additional teenage passenger.  And, unfortunately, I get calls with that exact scenario far too often. Those are the cases that truly make me cry.  And then I spend some extra time with my kids.

Distracted Driving Apps Might Help Curb Teen Car Accidents and Deaths

Smartphones have put the world at our fingertips - particularly our social world. And that's hard for teens to ignore. That ping you hear which signals you to reach for your phone? It's addicting. Physiologically addicting. Read this fascinating blog to find out why our brains will not allow us to ignore the ping.

New distracted driving apps can help us ignore the ping.

By incentivizing safe driving, or even directly blocking you from using your phone while driving, these apps can help keep your attention on the road instead of the phone. According to DMV.org, these apps offer safety features that can:

  • Mute text alerts
  • Send calls to voicemail
  • Send auto-replies via text that the person is driving and cannot respond
  • Some will even send alerts to parents

I admit that as a parent, I sometimes get frustrated if my kids don't answer my calls, especially when I don't know they are driving.  But I'd rather them get to their destination safely and then respond rather than try to answer and wreck on the way.

With numerous apps that can help curb distracted driving, we cannot review them all. Here are some which offer more (and more interesting) ways to cut distracted driving than simply a locked phone.

Get FREE Cash and Incentives for Not Texting While Driving

PADD (People Against Distracted Driving) has approved two unique apps that offer positive reinforcement to ignore your phone while driving.

Drive BeeHive is a unique peer-to-peer app. You pair with a sponsor to earn rewards points for not using your phone while driving. It is enabled when the driver opens Drive BeeHive and begins driving. A lock screen appears and will count the driver's "safe miles." All it takes to earn those miles for that trip is to not use the phone behind the wheel. If you do, your miles are reset back to zero. Once the driver reaches their goal, their sponsor will be notified to release their reward. PADD is working with consumer sponsors to offer actual rewards in the form of discounts, coupons, and freebies.

AT&T DriveMode is also piggybacking on the positive incentive wave. This app allows you to set up your own prizes for a private group of drivers or for the public. The device works by blocking any phone calls or texting and driving. DriveMode can be set up to automatically start when you are driving over 15 MPH. You can even have it notify you when your teen driver has the app deactivated or if certain settings are changed.

Distracted Driving Apps That Track Driving Habits

Remember when your driver's ed instructor would ding you for making "jack rabbit starts and stops"? You got dinged a few times and eventually learned how to start and stop smoothly. Some apps can now reinforce this in your teen (or any) driver.

Consumer Reports favorably reviewed the Cellcontrol DriveID. It can record braking, acceleration, speed, cornering, and key driving events showing the scores on the app for the driver - or the driver's parents - to view. This Bluetooth technology device attaches under your rearview mirror and pairs their app with your cell phone to help curb impulses to check, chat, or text. Your phone screen goes into screen-lock mode when the car starts moving, and only 911 or designated phone numbers are accessible. This technology also has the capability to rate driving patterns and phone usage on a scoring system.

Apps That Alert Others When You're Driving

The Wonder app empowers not only the driver, but also people who may try to text or call the driver, to make the decision not to contact them while driving. By viewing a red or green dot, contacts within the app will know that you are driving before texting or calling. One downside, Wonder only works if all parties involved have the app.

There are dozens of other apps you can check out yourself, including Sprint's Drive First, T-Mobile's DriveSmart, and Verizon's Driving Mode, among others. Many of these and other apps are free.

Get FREE Advice From NC Car Wreck Attorneys

Whether you download a distracted driving app or not, don't ignore the risks of distracted driving. We are all in this together and everyone's at risk. If you or someone you love was injured in a car wreck, whether or not it involved a distracted driver, contact an experienced car wreck lawyer.

Studies have shown that, on average, car accident victims who hired a personal injury lawyer to represent them received 3.5X more compensation for their loss than they would have on their own*.

Contact us now for a free case evaluation to see if we can help or call us at 1-866-900-7078.

* Insurance Research Council 1999

 

Storied Attorney Hoyt Tessener Talks Candidly About Why He Joined James Scott Farrin

Hoyt Tessener joined our firm this year and we are excited to have him on board. Hoyt has an enviable reputation among other attorneys as being tough, meticulously prepared, yet fair and honest. He worked as a defense lawyer for major large corporations before deciding to represent individuals. So he has a broad and unique perspective of both sides of the law. He has won multiple multimillion dollar verdicts* in many high-profile cases, and is currently leading our formidable Charlotte School of Law legal team.

We sat down with Hoyt to learn a bit more about what led him to become a lawyer, and why he chose the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin to continue his accomplished legal career.

Your reputation precedes you as a tough-minded, meticulously prepared attorney who has fought tooth and nail for clients on many large high-profile cases. That's pretty flattering. What do you think makes you that way?

Hoyt: That is extremely flattering. Of course James Scott Farrin is already a successful firm and represents people well. I've been told I connect with people well. I think I have a good sense of people and what's important to them and what they need as a result in trial.

I am very competitive and I like fighting for the underdog. I think my background has a lot to do with how I am today. I have represented very big companies - but they never once sent me a Christmas card!

When you represent the little guy who really needs your help, it's more rewarding - and it's necessary. The last trial I was in had 15 lawyers stacked against us. But they only get to speak one at a time.

Tell us about your clients, and how you connect with them. What do they need?

Hoyt: They need someone to guide them through the legal process. They are frightened, they've been hurt or wronged, and whatever resources they need, they may not have during this difficult time. People who have been severely hurt depend on me. They can't do what they normally do like go to work and take care of their family. They didn't get up that morning and realize they could be paralyzed that night. And all of a sudden without any preparation and through no fault of their own, their life is changed and they don't know where to go or what to do. They need someone they can relate to and they know will fight for them and do the very best for them.

You mentioned your background. How did you grow up?

Hoyt: I grew up in Shelby, North Carolina - a textile town. My father died when I was 9. My mom remarried when I was about 14. My stepfather was the father in my life. He was a man's man. He owned an auto body shop with his two brothers. Sports were important to him and to Shelby, so I grew up playing all sports.

During my senior year I applied to two colleges - NC State and UNC. For me, back then I didn't understand the difference between a public college and a private one. Nobody in my family went to college. I had never been on either of the college campuses, but they seemed like the best schools, and tuition was only $300 a month. My mother saved every penny of the Social Security checks when my father died. She gave me that check every month and told me I was going to college. I had about $4,000 back then, and that was plenty of money to go to college. I applied at early admissions to State and Carolina and got accepted to both, and I had to decide within a week!

I thought the reason you went to college was to get a better job when you got out and went to work. There were a lot of textile mills in Shelby, and if you got a degree you could work in management in the textile mills. So I looked at that. And since you could get a Bachelor of Science degree in Textiles at State, I checked the box for State. When I arrived at State for orientation, it was the first time I had ever been there.

When you go to court, what are you to your clients?

Hoyt: I am their champion. I am there to champion their rights.

When you go to court, you are there to try to win that trial for your client and you need to do it with integrity. I will be prepared for everything. I always tell the truth good or bad. The jurors know that. If there is anything bad, they are going to hear it from me. I'm not going to hide anything from them.

Why did you make the switch from representing big companies to representing individual plaintiffs?

Hoyt: I started out representing banks, insurance companies, and corporations. I worked for a great firm with great people, but they did not represent the people I wanted to be a lawyer for.

When I was working at a textile mill in South Carolina, I had to lay someone off who had five kids and his wife had just died. He came to me crying, but I had to make that decision when I was just 22. So I watched how people's lives were affected by big corporate decisions, and how their jobs and the decisions made for them defined them. When the textile business took a turn for the worse, I looked across at my boss who was 12 to 14 years older than me, married, with a mortgage. He was tied to that job. I thought to myself I have to do something else. My background was better suited for medical school because of my college courses, but my wife wasn't interested in being married to a doctor. (She may feel differently now.) My father-in-law had his law degree and was a plant manager in Alabama. He'd gone to law school at night, graduated first in his law school class in Birmingham. And then the best law firm in Birmingham offered him $350 a month, and he was making $1200 as plant manager with a wife and two kids. He said he couldn't afford to be a lawyer. But he told me that a law degree helps you think critically, see things objectively and manage fairly. He was successful, and he is a perfect example of how law school prepares you, so I decided to go to law school.

At the time, Campbell Law School made every student go through the trial advocacy program, and every part of that fit me to a tee. I won a lot of competitions, and litigation just seemed right. It's funny, when I meet my friends from college or high school, every single person seems to think I found my exact calling.

What sort of strategic advantage does having worked for companies and banks give you now that you're on the Farrin team and a plaintiff's attorney?

Hoyt: Going to trial is a war of sorts. I tell my clients, "Look, if we go to mediation, everyone has to agree. It may not be everything we want or they want, but in the end we can't make them do anything and they can't make us do anything. So there is no reason to play mean, get upset, fight, or yell about this and that." I've done it a few times, but I try not to.

But trial is a whole different ball game because a decision is going to be made, so you have to fight. The defense lawyers are serving at least two masters - their client and whoever is paying the bill. They might also be serving the boss too. When you are representing the plaintiff, the only person you answer to is the plaintiff. You make decisions on the case based upon your client and what they are going through, using all your experience. The defendants' attorneys don't get to do that.

I think having a background in both defense and plaintiff representation is really helpful. It can be reassuring to the client who's in this terrible spot. It's reassuring they know you lived on the other side of the curtain for some period of time. They realize, "Wow. This guy sat on that side of the table before and may know what they are thinking and what they are doing." So I think it provides comfort and some security. I tell my clients, "I will always tell you what I think you should do. But what you decide is up to you. You're hiring us to take this to court, and if you want to go to court on a matter of principle then we will go to court on a matter of principle, it is your right. I'll tell you all the options and what I think you should do." But in the end, the client makes the decision. In the end, if our clients are satisfied, then we have done our job.

At this point in your career you are obviously very accomplished. You've chosen to define yourself in part by coming to work at James Scott Farrin, so what is it about the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin that made it attractive for someone like you?

Hoyt: I think it's a good marriage. This firm provides legal representation for people who may not get representation anywhere else. Insurance companies have made it very difficult to get a fair result without speaking with an attorney. In addition and especially in North Carolina, justice is tilted severely away from the injured. Many other law firms just cannot afford to represent many of the clients helped by JSF. JSF is so well organized and reaches so many people, that JSF can help. In my career I have tried cases throughout North Carolina. It is my belief that all cases must be prepared for trial. It is our hope that we can reach a fair settlement but that is not always the case. My skill set is valuing cases, planning strategy, and going to court. JSF gives me that opportunity along with the opportunity to mentor young attorneys. It is the highest calling for an attorney to represent those most in need. JSF recognizes that we are the last warriors for those in need and gives me the opportunity to continue to do what I have done for decades in a firm with integrity and sound management.

What do you consider your greatest accomplishment within the courtroom?

Hoyt: The easy answer is winning* at trial when we were offered nothing. The next easiest answer is winning a case or settling a case where we not only made a difference in our client's life, we made a difference by making the world a little safer. What I most remember can be summed up in the movie The Guardian with Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher. Kutcher is this young great swimmer. Kevin Costner is a Coast Guard rescue swimmer. That's a very dangerous job. They bring you out in a helicopter and drop you into the water from 30 feet near a burning boat or whatever. Ashton Kutcher wants to be a Coast Guard rescue swimmer, and he's a great collegiate swimmer. Kevin Costner's character is a trainer. Ashton Kutcher keeps asking how many people he has saved, and Costner never answers. I don't remember the number precisely but toward the end of the movie, Costner looks at Kutcher and says "36." Here Costner has been a rescue swimmer for something like 30 years. Kutcher looks at Costner, and Costner says, "Oh are you not impressed?" And Costner repeats, "36. Those are the ones I lost." He didn't keep track of the ones he saved. Only the ones he lost.

I'm like Costner in that sense. I can tell you in vivid detail all the cases I've lost rather than the ones I've won. I don't lose anything personally from losing a case, but my client could be going to bed hungry, can't take care of their family and get the medical care they need, and possibly losing their self-respect. So the pressure is intense, because where else can they go?

How many times have you been to trial?

Hoyt: As best I can tell around 130 times with a verdict and another 50 or 60 times that settled. I only take a few cases to trial at a time now, because the types of severe injury cases I take now can take weeks to try. Clients need to know that when you go to trial they're your only case, they have to be your focus. And that's a great thing about being at a place like James Scott Farrin. You've got the resources to take your case to trial, try it against anybody, and utilize the firm's vast technological resources to your advantage.

Jim Farrin: You have a tremendous amount of experience and we are happy to have you on board. I believe confidence and nerve also play a part in your success. There are some lawyers who try to take the easy way out and tell the client they're getting a good settlement, just so they can be done with it and have the next weekend or few weeks off, and I've seen some lawyers at some firms do that. But it takes a lot of experience and guts to keep pushing for what you know your client may deserve.

Hoyt: I think you've got it analyzed very well, and I can tell you there have been times when I have gotten offers initially and said that's reasonable. You must value your case based upon your experience including your experiences at trial. You then discuss the value with your client. If the opposing side offers the value, you should encourage your client to accept. However, if you do not get the value that you objectively discussed with your client, it is your professional duty to go to trial.

The one thing insurance companies do not like is uncertainty. And juries are not controlled by insurance companies so by nature a jury is an uncertainty for an insurance company. The one place that an individual still has a level playing field is the courtroom. Our judges are very good, but they don't get to make the laws, they just interpret them. We want our cases in the hands of the jury where the field gets leveled. Jurors bring different life experiences and beliefs, and putting their whole emotional intelligence together to evaluate a case is the best way to get the right result.

At one time I heard you to say that you felt the jury selection process is a key component of your strategy.

Hoyt: Oh I think it's the most important thing in the trial because it is the first time attorneys can talk to the jurors. It's the one time plaintiffs have the advantage because we get to go first. The jurors make the decision about my client's future. I look at it this way. The judge is the umpire but the jury decides the outcome. As a matter of fact, I have taught a course on jury selection at Campbell for the last 15 years.

Are you in touch with other lawyers on a national level?

Hoyt: Yes. I am part of several organizations around the country. These organizations are by invitation only to help each other address the overwhelming advantage large corporations and insurance companies have over the individual. I've worked with lawyers from North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, California, Kansas, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida, Alabama, Utah, Texas, Pennsylvania, and D.C. I'm also licensed in Georgia.

Who would you say has been of influence to you in some way?

Hoyt: Gene Boyce and Carole Gailor. Gene and Carole were my first bosses and the first attorneys I went to trial with. Carole and Gene understood the case, the other side, the judge, the jury and their clients. Gene is the absolute best civil litigator that has ever come close to North Carolina, in my opinion. Carole has the uncanny ability to know exactly what buttons to push. I was very fortunate.

What is one of life's lessons you have learned from being a trial lawyer?

Hoyt: How precious life and health are. No one plans to be hurt, killed, or wronged. Most people gloss over the news reports believing it will never happen to them. That is exactly what the people in the news thought too - until it does. No matter how careful you are something bad can happen to you or yours.

*Each case is unique and must be evaluated on its own merits. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

 

 

 

My Workers’ Comp Adjuster Won’t Return Calls or Authorize Medical Treatment. What Should I Do?

I cannot begin to tell you how many times I've gotten a call from an injured worker who needed a lawyer because the insurance company adjuster would not return phone calls or simply seemed to stop all forms of communication.

Not only is this offensive, but it's just plain rude.

There's one story in our free booklet, Insurance Companies (and others) Behaving Badly about an insurance adjuster who waited months before responding to an injured worker. When we got involved and reached the adjuster, she made light of the fact that she had ignored our client, and said she would make a decision in two weeks. Two weeks?*

In workers' comp, we trade stories like this all the time. In our experience, some adjusters will sit on cases just to keep our clients waiting, hoping to wear them out. Unfortunately, this type of "avoid and delay" approach does wear some people out until they just give up. And that's why some insurance companies do it.

Here at our firm, we know their approach. We'll fight that approach.

These injured workers are usually people in need of medical treatment or disability payments. Payments they may be entitled to. Payments that may make a huge difference between deciding to pay their rent or pay their utilities, or even whether to buy food in some cases. Or payments that may mean the difference in continuing to get the medical care they need.

Injured workers can too often experience unnecessary pain and financial hardships just because some adjusters ignoring their pleas for help!

What to Do If an Insurance Adjuster Won't Return Your Calls

My professional observation over the 23+ years I've been an attorney is that insurance companies do not hire enough adjusters to manage the number of cases they have.

Sadly, the reason they don't, in my opinion, is likely related to money. Most insurance companies are for-profit businesses. The less people they hire, the less money they have to spend. And as we've seen day in and day out, it seems that some insurance companies hope that the injured workers will just give up and go away. Many of them do go away. But this type of treatment is not fair or appropriate under our workers compensation laws.

If you find yourself in a situation in which the adjuster won't return your calls, here's what I suggest.

  • Sometimes, it's simply a function of the "squeaky wheel gets the grease." Call the adjuster often and leave messages every day reminding them that you need medical treatment in order to return to work, or that you need your disability check so that you can pay your bills.
  • Call the adjuster's supervisor as frequently as you feel you need to. While frustrating, we have found that this approach often works.
  • If you need follow-up medical care, try calling the doctor's office that the carrier sent you to and ask them to schedule an appointment and ask that they get approval from the adjuster.
  • In other words, be a pest.

But if you don't want to go through all that rigmarole, or if you don't have the time to follow up every day with letters and phone calls, hire an experienced workers' comp attorney from the start.

North Carolina Workers' Comp Lawyers Can Help You...

  • Communicate with the adjuster and others
  • Try to get your payments started, or continued in some cases
  • Keep your case moving along
  • Try to negotiate a higher settlement than you may be able to on your own
  • Try to obtain medical benefits the insurance company is denying
  • Fight for a measure of job security if, for example, the insurance company forces you to go back to a made up job, which may be disguised as "light duty," "modified duty," or "restrictive" employment. (These jobs are sometimes eliminated later.)
  • Give you added peace of mind knowing you have someone who is championing your rights

And many other things, depending on your situation. Think you can't afford legal help? Think again. Most workers' comp attorneys work on a contingency fee basis set by the state of North Carolina. The standard fee is 25%, and it usually comes out of any payments your attorney helps you collect from the insurance company. This 25% set rate affords you the peace of mind of not having to worry about a particular lawyer or law firm being "too expensive." And it allows you to choose a law firm you feel is best suited for your situation - without having to worry about fees.

Get a FREE Case Evaluation from North Carolina Workers' Comp Attorneys

If you feel you're getting the run-around, or that your insurance company may not have your best interests at heart, contact us or call 1-866-900-7078.

Let one of our workers' comp attorneys  - six of whom are North Carolina Board Certified Specialists in workers' compensation law - evaluate your situation for free.

* This is a specific example of an experience we had with an insurance company and adjuster. This does not necessarily represent any industry as a whole. The description of events are based upon the recollections of individual staff members.

Contact Information

Raleigh Law Office

5848-100 Faringdon Place
Raleigh, NC 27609
Phone: 919-834-1184
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Durham Law Office

280 South Mangum Street, Suite 400
Durham, NC 27701
Phone: 919-688-4991
Fax: 800-716-7881

Fayetteville Law Office

517 Owen Drive
Fayetteville, NC 28304
Phone: 910-488-0611
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Charlotte Law Office

1001 Morehead Square Drive, Suite 350
Charlotte, NC 28203
Phone: 704-599-1078
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

New Bern Law Office

1505 South Glenburnie Rd, Unit P
New Bern, NC 28562
Phone: 252-634-9010
Toll Free: 1-866-780-3422

Greenville Law Office

702 G Cromwell Dr.
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: 252-355-5205
Toll Free: 1-866-780-3227

Greensboro Law Office

300 N. Greene Street, Suite 850
Greensboro, North Carolina 27401
Phone: 336-665-7072
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Goldsboro Law Office

214 South William Street, Suite 3
Goldsboro, NC 27530
Phone: (919)-731-2581
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Henderson Law Office

514 Dabney Drive, Suite 200
Henderson, NC 27536
Phone: 252-492-4600
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Roanoke Rapids Law Office

709 Julian R. Allsbrook Highway
Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870
Phone: 252-537-9670
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Rocky Mount Law Office

3202 Sunset Avenue, Suite B
Rocky Mount, NC 27804
Phone: 252-937-4730
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Sanford Law Office

703-B South Horner Boulevard
Sanford, NC 27330
Phone: 919-775-1564
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Wilson Law Office

2315 Airport Blvd Suite A
Wilson, North Carolina 27896
Phone: 252-246-9090
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

Winston-Salem Law Office

301 N. Main Street, Suite 2409-C
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078